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2.18.2014

MOCA presents Yellow Peril! and A Is For Arab: Understanding Xenophobia

Thursday, February 20 at the Museum of Chinese in America



If you're in New York City, your'e invited to Yellow Peril! and A Is For Arab: Understanding Xenophobia, a panel and book signing with authors John Kuo Wei Tchen and Dylan Eats (Yellow Peril! An Archive of Anti-Asian Fear) and Jack Shaheen (A is for Arab: Archiving Stereotypes in U.S. Popular Culture), who will discuss xenophobia in America and the impact of stereotypical portrayals of Asians and Arabs in public perception and national policy. It's happening Thursday, February 20 at the Museum of Chinese in America.

Here are some more details:

Yellow Peril! and A Is For Arab: Understanding Xenophobia

Thu, Feb 20, 2014 from 6pm - 8pm

Admission: Free

John Kuo Wei Tchen, Dylan Yeats (authors, Yellow Peril! An Archive of Anti-Asian Fear), Jack Shaheen (author, A is for Arab: Archiving Stereotypes in U.S. Popular Culture) and moderator Sewell Chan (Deputy Editor, Op-Ed/Sunday Review, The New York Times) will discuss xenophobia in America and the impact of stereotypical portrayals of Asians and Arabs in public perception and national policy. A book-signing session will take place afterwards. This panel discussion is presented as part of MOCACITIZEN, a signature public program series by MOCA, highlighting community, social justice, organizations, and the people dedicated to amplifying the voices that often go unheard.

The “yellow peril” is one of the oldest and most pervasive racist ideas in Western culture—dating back to the birth of European colonialism during the Enlightenment. Yet while Fu Manchu looks almost quaint today, the prejudices that gave him life persist in modern culture. Yellow Peril! An Archive of Anti-Asian Fear is the first comprehensive repository of anti-Asian images and writing, and it surveys the extent of this iniquitous form of paranoia.

A is for Arab: Archiving Stereotypes in U.S. Popular Culture features photographs of objects and materials from the Jack G. Shaheen Archive at Tamiment Library & Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, and documents U.S. popular culture representations of Arabs and Muslims from the early-20th century to the present. Jack G. Shaheen Archive, contains nearly 3,000 moving images including motion pictures, cartoons, newsreels, and televisions programs, as well as editorial cartoons, advertisements, books, magazines, comic books, toys, and games featuring anti-Arab and anti-Muslim depictions.
For further information, go to the MOCA website.