Showing posts with label guest post. Show all posts
Showing posts with label guest post. Show all posts

10.10.2014

Excerpt: A Roof & Some Refuge

Guest Post by Cara Van Le



Photo credit: Jeffer

The following are edited excerpts from A Roof & Some Refuge, a collection of stories and poems about my dad that I wrote in 2012.

2.

My father thinks forgetting is an active verb.

Hunger is an acquired taste, he says. You Americans wouldn't know the flavor. I am a scavenger for details that are not fed to me:

10.07.2014

Most Asian Americans Oppose Affirmative Action? That is incorrect.

Guest Post by Karthick Ramakrishnan



Two weeks ago, my survey group released a report on affirmative action that analyzed whether Asian Americans (and others in California) were opposed to affirmative action. Turns out that, contrary to all the noise we heard in March 2014, there are more Asian Americans who support affirmative action than those who oppose them. Many more, like 69% for and 13% against, with the rest expressing no opinion.

9.12.2014

Attacking abortion rights by throwing Asians under the bus

San Francisco resolution opposes this trending abortion ban


Guest Post by Linda Yang

I don't know about you, but going to the lady doctor's office -- or any doctor for that matter -- has never been a walk in the park for me. Reclining on that table covered by a large piece of paper napkin from the waist down, staring at the gray-green drop ceiling, I certainly never feel my most confident or assertive self. Now imagine that instead of focusing on your physical wellbeing, your doctor is guessing whether you are the kind of Asian who is asking about an abortion because you prefer boys over girls. And if they do suspect it, is obligated to deny you abortion services.

9.05.2014

The Sadness and Shame of 'Jonah from Tonga'

Guest Post by Alisi Tulua



It is hard to unpack the debilitating sadness and frustration I felt watching the HBO series Jonah from Tonga; so hard that it took me a long time to write this down. I imagine that the same is felt by my fellow Tongan brothers and sisters who have watched the show.

7.14.2014

Osama's Ghost on Streets of America

By Vishavjit Singh. Cross-posted from Sikhtoons.



The article below was rejected by a diverse array of news outlets. One explained "there is not enough of a new story here." A film-maker acquaintance shared similar struggle pitching an idea along the theme of this article sometime ago. Potential funders responded with "Racism against Sikhs and the use of the 'O' word is so cliched and overdone." Apparently we Sikhs need to find ourselves being targeted in innovative ways for being news worthy! So here is the same old news for you. If it moves you, share it, comment on it, share your experience, make it your news.

Osama Bin Laden has been dead for over 3 years.

But his ghost lives on and quite responsive to news events of jihadi flavor.

As our new streams fill with the advance and images of ISIS in Iraq, the ingrained countenance of the Saudi who personified hate at its worst in his living days finds outlets in the most unlikely of places.

6.17.2014

This Guy is Officially the Most Excited Player at the World Cup

Guest Post by @angryplus1



I don't know about you, but even though FIFA is super evil and there are tons of very legit reasons to feel that this soccer spectacle is all a big sham, our household is incredibly excited about the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

But do you know who's the most excited? 24-year-old Hiroki Sakai, a defender on the Japan National Team.

I mean, just look at his profile picture:

6.06.2014

Why We Need Diverse Books

Guest Post by Ellen Oh



Young adult author and educator Ellen Oh, founder of the #WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign, shares some of the personal reasons that compelled her call-to-arms for more diversity in contemporary literature.

So the first thing people ask me these days is how did the WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign come about? There's the basic answer -- the one about how I've been fighting for diversity and against racism for years. And then there's the series of events that all lead up to it. I haven't felt up to talking about the private stuff before. But I realize it is an important part of how I ended up here.

Earlier this year, my dad had a major stroke so severe that the doctors told my family to say our goodbyes. And then a miracle, he survived. But at what cost? He was paralyzed and his memory was so badly affected that he didn't remember our names, and sometimes even who we were.

As I tried to deal with the emotional turmoil in my personal life, I was overwhelmed by a feeling of helplessness. I couldn't fix my father. And the help I could give felt useless. I didn't know what to do but I focused on supporting my mother with my dad. It was in the midst of my personal despair that news about the BookCon Blockbuster's Read program hit Twitter and I remember talking to Malinda Lo about the continued lack of representation at these major book events. We kept talking about it and I began to feel a growing rage within me. And then something just snapped. I was just so angry and frustrated and feeling so helpless. I just wanted to hit something. I just needed to do something. I needed to channel my rage into something positive. And I kept saying over and over again "We need to do something really big. So big that no one can ignore us anymore." There were quite a few people who scoffed at me. Told me I was wasting my time. However, there was even more people who came to me and said, "What do you want to do? I'm in!"

9.24.2013

Dear Pastor Rick Warren, I Think You Don’t Get It

Guest Post by Kathy Khang, More Than Serving Tea



You know it's going to be an interesting day when you wake up to FB tags and messages about "something you would blog about."

My dear readers, you know me too well.

This photo is currently on Rick Warren's FB page and his Twitter feed. [EDIT: The photo has since been removed.] Apparently the image captures "the typical attitude of Saddleback Staff as they start work each day." Hmmm. I didn't realize Saddleback was akin to the Red Army. Warren's defense (and that of his supporters) is one that I AM SO SICK AND TIRED OF HEARING! It goes something like this:

7.28.2013

Back to Blogging



I'm back. And dammit, my vacation was waaaaaay too short. I'm going to need a moment to get things back to normal around here -- you'll have to excuse you me while I catch up on news and sift through the giant heap of email that piled up while I was away. But huge thanks to all the great friends who stepped up to contribute some amazing guest posts to keep things going during my time off. I owe you all a drink!

Here's a rundown of all of last week's guest posts, in case you missed any:

7.27.2013

10 Things I'll Do With My Soon-To-Be Twin Brother

Guest Post by Dan Matthews



Hey, folks! I'm on vacation, taking a much-needed blog break. Some batteries need recharging. But don't worry -- I've enlisted the generous help of some great guest bloggers to keep things fresh around here while I'm gone. Here's Dan Matthews sharing about his journey to meet his biological family -- and his twin brother(!) -- for the first time.

This week I'll find out if I have a biological family. And I'll find out if I have a twin brother.

I mean, I know I have a biological family somewhere, hence... me being alive (maybe not necessarily a twin brother... unless everyone has a twin sibling they don't know about). But this week I'll find out if I'm actually related to the biological family that had recently revealed themselves to me. My honest to God, this is your blood, FAMILY. I'm maybe 5 days from finding out. And it's FREAKING me out.

So, I could think of no better way to fill up the void of this blog space left by Angry Asian Man than to write about how it feels to be in emotional limbo while waiting to hear back from DNA results determining whether or not someone is related to you.

Saving My Mother With a Safety Pin

Guest Post by Jen Wang



Hey, folks! I'm on vacation, taking a much-needed blog break. Some batteries need recharging. But don't worry -- I've enlisted the generous help of some great guest bloggers to keep things fresh around here while I'm gone. Here's Jen Wang of Disgrasian on her mother, happiness and life-saving safety pins.

A recent study published by the London School of Economics found that happiness peaks at two times in your life: age 23, and again at age 69. My mother turned 69 this year. And she'll tell you she's happy, very happy, in fact, the exact words she used to describe herself just the other day.

This was in the same breath as her telling me that she has no energy or the desire to do anything any more, and she's worried sick about getting older. She's worried that, like her own father, she'll get struck down by a heart attack. (She's had two angioplasties in the last 20 years.) She's worried she'll have a stroke. She's afraid when she comes to visit me for long periods how far away she is from her doctors. She vows that her next move will be to a home closer to the hospital.

"Oldest-and-still-running-Asian American blah blah blah..."

Guest Post by Traci Kato-Kiriyama



Hey, folks! I'm on vacation, taking a much-needed blog break. Some batteries need recharging. But don't worry -- I've enlisted the generous help of some great guest bloggers to keep things fresh around here while I'm gone. Here's Traci Kato-Kiriyama on art, community, and the unsung heroes of Little Tokyo.

If you've heard about a thing called "Tuesday Night Cafe" you might have heard this line: "We're one of the longest-running, free, public art+community series in Downtown L.A. and the oldest-and-still-running Asian American-run open mic space in the country..."

What does that even mean?

After saying that at a recent TNC celebrating several kick ass LA-based AAPI LGBTIQ organizations, it made me pause and take a look back...

7.26.2013

How to Be Mistaken for a Prostitute in China

Guest Post by Dorcas Cheng-Tozun



Hey, folks! I'm on vacation, taking a much-needed blog break. Some batteries need recharging. But don't worry -- I've enlisted the generous help of some great guest bloggers to keep things fresh around here while I'm gone. Here's Dorcas Cheng-Tozun with a step-by-step guide to being mistaken for a prostitute in China.

Step 1: Marry a white man.

When I was a senior in college, a Chinese American student wrote a scathing op-ed in the school newspaper about the bane of white men dating Asian women on campus. He blamed the men for poaching Asian women; he blamed the women for not giving their Asian brethren a chance; he blamed all parties for perpetuating nasty stereotypes. His column ignited a vigorous debate on campus.

The paper did a follow-up article on just who these outrageous white-Asian couples were. My then-boyfriend -- now husband -- and I were interviewed for the article. (Ned is technically half-Turkish and half-Jewish, but in this context, that didn't matter. He's white enough.) We talked about the challenges of cross-cultural romance and how we tried to be sensitive to one another's heritage. But we were confident we could find a way to make it work. And we did.

We married four years after graduating and enjoyed copious amounts of marital bliss. See? I wanted to tell that guy from college. Asian-white relationships can be a beautiful thing.

Three years later, we moved to China -- and I realized I had no idea what I was talking about.

Asian Americans: Yes, we're slackers. No, it's not a good thing.

Guest Post by Karthick Ramakrishnan



Hey, folks! I'm on vacation, taking a much-needed blog break. Some batteries need recharging. But don't worry -- I've enlisted the generous help of some great guest bloggers to keep things fresh around here while I'm gone. Here's Karthick Ramakrishnan on the dangers of Asian American slackerdom.

First, let me clarify that I'm not against all slackerdom. The model minority myth continues to have a powerful hold on our society, and it doesn't help when news organizations and research institutes continue to perpetuate them. And slacker exemplars like Harold and Kumar have single (double?) handedly taken down the myth by a few notches. And that's a good thing. There's very little good that comes out of seeing all of us as monolithic, hyper-ambitious, over-achieving, over-qualified. I get it.

7.25.2013

Asian Bad Guys from Die Hard, The Karate Kid Part II & Rambo II Still Kick Ass

Guest Post by Stephen Dypiangco



Hey, folks! I'm on vacation, taking a much-needed blog break. Some batteries need recharging. But don't worry -- I've enlisted the generous help of some great guest bloggers to keep things fresh around here while I'm gone. Here's Stephen Dypiangco of National Film Society on his love for Awesome Asian Bad Guys.

Dreams come true. Seriously. This past June, I had the unbelievable privilege of collaborating with several of my childhood heroes while co-directing and co-starring in the forthcoming action comedy web series Awesome Asian Bad Guys. How and why did this all magically happen? Well back in 2011, my National Film Society filmmaking partner Patrick and I made a video celebrating the kickass Asian actors who played bad guys in countless action movies we watched growing up in the 80s and 90s. These actors were cool as hell, but we had no idea who they were or what they were like. Their characters rarely had any dialogue, and they usually ended up maimed, beaten to a pulp or dead.

Patrick and I wanted to make an Expendables-like project that called these Asian badasses out of the shadows and placed them front and center. Thus was born Awesome Asian Bad Guys.

Here Lies Love - A New American Musical Experience

Guest Post by Raymond J. Lee




Hey, folks! I'm on vacation, taking a much-needed blog break. Some batteries need recharging. But don't worry -- I've enlisted the generous help of some great guest bloggers to keep things fresh around here while I'm gone. Here, Raymond J. Lee interviews Jose Llana, one of the stars the musical Here Lies Love.

There's a new musical taking New York by storm and it is composed of a majority Asian American cast singing and dancing to the electric music of David Byrne and Fatboy Slim. Here Lies Love tells the story of Filipina First Lady Imelda Marcos and her rise to political stature. Featuring a cast of amazing Asian American triple threats, the show is now enjoying its fourth and final extension at New York's acclaimed The Public Theater. Directed by Alex Timbers, the show has already won an accolade of awards including the Outer Critics Circle for Outstanding New Off-Broadway Musical.

I got the chance to see this show the past month and it absolutely blew my mind. Not only it is a vibrant show filled with sensational music and award-worthy performances, but it is one of the first full-out Asian American musicals solely about Asian characters that has reached widespread popularity and critical acclaim in the past few years.

I got the chance to sit down with Jose Llana, one of the stars of Here Lies Love to talk about the show and his career as an Asian American actor.

My Parenting Style: Ignorance and Optimism

Guest Post by Elizabeth Jayne Liu



Hey, folks! I'm on vacation, taking a much-needed blog break. Some batteries need recharging. But don't worry -- I've enlisted the generous help of some great guest bloggers to keep things fresh around here while I'm gone. Here's Elizabeth Jayne Liu of Flourish in Progress on parenting failures and shining moments.

I had two things working against me when I became a mother: ignorance and optimism.

I was 18 years old and operating on a very limited budget when I got pregnant, so I didn't buy any parenting books. It seemed simple enough. Did I need to spend $19.95 for an "expert" to explain in hundreds of pages what I could distill down into a few easy steps?

7.24.2013

Hollywood isn't racist. It's worse.

Guest Post by Tak Toyoshima



Hey, folks! I'm on vacation, taking a much-needed blog break. Some batteries need recharging. But don't worry -- I've enlisted the generous help of some great guest bloggers to keep things fresh around here while I'm gone. Here's Tak Toyoshima, aka Secret Asian Man, on race, casting and Hollywood indifference.

For years, Hollywood has been a target for the Asian American community to fire off wave upon wave of wrath-filled petitioning and highly organized protests. Occasionally Hollywood rears its swollen head and notices and offers up a luke warm apology beginning with the words "We apologize to anyone who was offended. It was not our intention." Translation: "We're sorry you have a problem with it."

But after watching controversies come and go, from the flaccid hug between Jet Li and Aaliyah in Romeo Must Die, to the whitewashing of The Last Airbender, from the proposed all white cast of the hopefully doomed live-action Akira movie to the sadly soon-to-arrive remake of Oldboy by Spike Lee, I've come to the conclusion that Hollywood is actually not racist against Asians. It's indifferent. You know, the opposite of love.

Part of Memory is Forgetting

Guest Post by Cara Van Le

Hey, folks! I'm on vacation, taking a much-needed blog break. Some batteries need recharging. But don't worry -- I've enlisted the generous help of some great guest bloggers to keep things fresh around here while I'm gone. Here's Cara Van Le, Angry Asian Intern, on awkward interaction and the question of ancestry.

I'm not a social butterfly. I like the warmth of my cocoon. It was only after a year of dodging invitations and one particularly difficult teaching day that I agreed to attend a happy hour with my co-workers. We arrived at the bar, assembled tables together, shuffled chairs, and before I knew it, I was locked somewhere in the middle, unable to make a getaway without getting my chair's legs tangled with those of someone else's. We exchanged the usual pleasantries. Work, weather, drinks of choice. And like clockwork, exactly what I was expecting to happen did.

7.23.2013

Angry Thoughts

Guest Post by Roy Choi



Hey, folks! I'm on vacation, taking a much-needed blog break. Some batteries need recharging. But don't worry -- I've enlisted the generous help of some great guest bloggers to keep things fresh around here while I'm gone. Here's Roy Choi with a list of things that make him angry.

Phil asked me to write a post.
I said yes.
Here you go.

All the things I'm angry about and sometimes wonder about:

angry archive