*

11.25.2022

They Call Us Bruce 180: They Call Us Thankful 2022

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome some good friends from the Potluck Podcast Collective: Ada Tseng (Los Angeles Times, Saturday School), Scott Okamoto (Asians in Baseball, Chapel Probation), and Kim Cooper (Asians in Baseball, Korean Drama Podcast) to celebrate friendsgiving and play a very special Thanksgiving edition of their signature segment: Thanks, No Thanks and WTF.

11.18.2022

They Call Us Bruce 179: They Call Us Bad Axe

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome filmmaker David Siev, director of the documentary Bad Axe, a pandemic portrait of his own family in rural Michigan as they fight to keep their American dream alive. He talks about telling his family's multi-generational story through the lens of America's very real and very current racial tensions, dealing with actual local white supremacists, and making a film that weirdly folded in on itself partway through production.

11.11.2022

They Call Us Bruce 178: They Call Us Maulik Pancholy

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome welcome back award-winning actor and writer Maulik Pancholy, who talks about his latest middle grade novel Nikhil Out Loud, a sweet coming-of-age story about a gay Indian American teen. He talks about the anti-gay backlash he received for his first book The Best at It that inspired this new novel, what it's like to get your book banned by school districts, and the important question at the center of all this controversy that nobody seems to be asking: who's listening to the kids?

11.04.2022

They Call Us Bruce 177: They Call Us Raymond lee

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome Raymond Lee, star of NBC's sci-fi drama Quantum Leap. He talks about leaping into the lead role of a lifetime, subverting the notion that time travel is for white people, and why being great at nothing but passably good at a lot of things is perfect for playing Dr. Ben Song.

11.03.2022

All The Asians On Star Trek 31: Away Mission with Swapna Krishna

The Podcast In Which We Interview All The Asians On Star Trek.



All The Asians On Star Trek is the podcast in which we interview all the Asians on Star Trek. In Episode 31, we embark on another Away Mission, in which we invite fellow Asian American fans of Star Trek to do a deep dive into an episode of their choosing. For this edition of the Away Mission, we welcome writer and journalist Swapna Krishna to discuss "Lineage" from season seven of Star Trek: Voyager. We discuss the ridiculous lack of privacy regarding pregnancy on the USS Voyager, extremely wise parenting advice from Tuvok, and a lonely night of soulful saxophone in Ensign Harry Kim's quarters.

10.31.2022

Your Halloween Costumes 2022

Our annual gallery of awesome reader-submitted Halloween costumes.



All right, good readers. It's that time of year again. In what has become a holiday tradition, I'm putting the call out for your awesome Halloween costume photos. Send in your rad, not-racist costume photos -- cute kids are particularly welcome -- to be considered for inclusion in the annual costume photo roundup. To submit your photos, email angryasianman @ angryasianman.com with the subject line "Halloween Costume 2022" or tag @angryasianman on social media. I'll feature the best ones here in our infamous annual gallery.

Getting things started:

10.30.2022

Read These



Bizarre Republican Ad Blames Biden for Anti-Asian Violence Incited by Trump
A new attack ad blames Joe Biden for the spike in racist violence against Asian Americans since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. When I do recall it was Donald Fucking Trump who started calling it "the Chinese virus" and "the Kung flu."

* * *

Can Social Media Rhetoric Incite Hate Incidents? Evidence from Trump's "Chinese Virus" Tweets
The number of anti-Asian incidents sharply increased following Donald Trump's initial "China virus" tweets -- especially in the Trump-supporting counties, where such incidents spiked by an estimated 4000 percent.

* * *

In California, two Asian Americans fight for a seat in the House — and with each other
Democrat Jay Chen is challenging Republican incumbent Michelle Steel in a district where more than a third of voters are Asian Americans. Some of the accusations being hurled, specifically around China and communism, have frustrated voters.

* * *

Asian Americans' Place in the History of Racial Justice
Ellen Wu discusses her forthcoming project focused on the plight of Asian Americans in the U.S. racial divide, as Ellen dives into the diverse cultural backgrounds of the Asian American population.

* * *

Asian Americans had the highest rate of mail-in voting in 2020. New laws could block that progress
"These states are reducing all the great practices of 2020 that made voting more accessible," Christine Chen, executive director of the nonpartisan organization Asian and Pacific Islander American Vote, said.

* * *

A Chinese Immigrant's Fearless Comedy Set Went Viral. Then Came the Backlash.
A Chinese Immigrant's Fearless Comedy Set Went Viral. Then Came the Backlash.


10.28.2022

They Call Us Bruce 176: They Call Us Jay Chen

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome Jay Chen, who is running for the U.S. House of Representatives in California’s congressional 45th district. He talks about why his Daily Show appearance from 2010 still weirdly remains relevant, his opponent’s increasingly shameless xenophobic and red-baiting attacks, and the benefit of running for congress in a super-Asian district that has so many incredible food options.

10.20.2022

They Call Us Bruce 175: They Call Us Thai Cave Rescue

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome Kevin Tancheroen, executive producer and director of the Netflix series Thai Cave Rescue, which tells the true story of the global rescue effort to save twelve young boys and their soccer coach from a flooded cave. He talks about shooting in absurdly wet conditions, reconnecting with his own Thai roots, and prioritizing the soccer team (and the people of Thailand) at the center of this extraordinary story.

10.13.2022

They Call Us Bruce 174: They Call Us 38 at the Garden

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome Frank Chi, director of the documentary short 38 AT THE GARDEN, which chronicles the extraordinary ascendance of Jeremy Lin during his landmark 2012 season with the New York Knicks -- and the fateful game where he dropped 38 points on the Los Angeles Lakers. They look back at the sheer joy of that moment, what Linsanity meant for Asian Americans, and why it still resonates ten years later.

10.09.2022

Read These



Jeremy Lin Finally Loves 'Linsanity' Just as Much as You Do
When he went from mostly anonymous to global celebrity in 2012, Jeremy Lin was overwhelmed by the attention and struggled to tune it out. For many people, he suddenly represented many things -- a stereotype breaker, an inspiration -- but he just wanted to play basketball. A decade later, Lin has fully embraced the phenomenon that turned him into a cultural icon.

* * *

Jeremy Lin Is Still Floating
Jeremy Lin's favorite bucket of his career happened right where you’d expect it: in Madison Square Garden, during that legendary stretch in 2012, leading his underdog Knicks over Kobe Bryant and the Lakers.

* * *

The Deadly Collision of Racism and Mental Illness
Talking openly about the role that mental illness may play in racially motivated violence seems overdue and necessary. But there are reasons conversations on this subject are also dangerous and fraught.

* * *

Alice Wong: I Still Have a Voice
Alice Wong can no longer speak. But she still has a voice.

* * *

I always avoided family duties. Then my dad had a fall and everything changed
"For most of my life, I've avoided moments like these -- moments where I have to take on any kind of family responsibility. I'm the youngest."

* * *

How L.A.'s Little Manila Disappeared Without a Trace
Many Filipino establishments between 1924 and 1939 could be found on First and Main streets in downtown Los Angeles. According to researcher Joseph A. Bernardo, "Little Manila" provided new Filipino migrants with a space space to ease the shock of urbanization, isolation and white antagonism.

* * *

The Nuance of Nikkei: Why Los Angeles Is the Epicenter of Japanese American Cooking
Experience LA's Nikkei moment at these four phenomenal restaurants.

* * *

Hasan Minhaj Explores the Darker Sides of Fame in The King's Jester
Hasan Minhaj is back on Netflix with The King's Jester, the comedian's second special following 2017's Homecoming King.


10.04.2022

All The Asians On Star Trek 30: Patrick Kwok-Choon

The Podcast In Which We Interview All The Asians On Star Trek.



All The Asians On Star Trek is the podcast in which we interview all the Asians on Star Trek. In Episode 30, we welcome actor Patrick Kwok-Choon, who plays tactical officer Lieutenant Commander Gen Rhys on Star Trek: Discovery. Outside of Star Trek, his credits include Open Heart, Backpackers, Shoot the Messenger, Wynonna Earp and SkyMed, among others. He talks being a part of Discovery's bridge crew, joining the tremendous legacy of Star Trek, and observing a healthy level of respect before putting his butt in the captain's chair.

10.03.2022

New Comic Reimagines Lois Lane as an Asian American Teen

First look at 'Girl Taking Over: A Lois Lane Story' by Sarah Kuhn and Arielle Jovellanos.



If you were like me, growing up as an Asian American consumer of comic books, you sometimes had to crane your neck to find representation within those four-color panels. And sometimes, intended or not, it was right there in front of you in plain black ink. I can't be the only one who interpreted Superman's canonically black hair as a signifier of Asian-ness -- by way of Krypton, of course. (Kal-El is an immigrant, don't ya know?)

For writer Sarah Kuhn, it was Lois Lane, intrepid reporter for the Daily Planet.

"Lois Lane is my idol — as a kid, I imprinted on her immediately and dreamed of becoming a hard-charging reporter on a quest for the truth (who also gets burgers and freshly squeezed orange juice delivered to her desk at 9 am)." Sarah says. "I was always desperately searching for some tiny scrap of representation in the stories I loved and Lois had dark hair, so sometimes I'd fantasize that she was Asian American -- like me."

Sarah, whose previous work includes the Cassandra Cain story Shadow of the Batgirl, gets to realize that fantasy in her upcoming original graphic novel, Girl Taking Over: A Lois Lane Story, due out in April 2023. Part of the DC Graphic Novels for Young Adults line, with art by Arielle Jovellanos, the book reimagines Lois Lane as an Asian American teenager -- a small town girl with a big city summer internship trying to get a handle on friendship, romance and a burgeoning career.

I'm pleased to share this first look at preview pages from Girl Taking Over:

10.02.2022

Read These



How to Hit Back
The desperate, confused, righteous campaign to stop Asian hate.

* * *

'I Felt Like We Are All Chinese — We Can Take Care of Each Other'
Asians and Pacific Islanders belong to the most economically divided racial group in America, and the need for child care often brings together members from the top and bottom of the ladder.

* * *

From BTS to Zoom therapy, why Korean Americans are seeking more mental health help
Korean Americans are seeking more mental health help than ever before, shifting the stigma.

* * *

The Mixed Metaphor
Why does the half-Asian, half-white protagonist make us so anxious?

* * *

How these Chinese doughnuts helped save my refugee family
Golden crullers, dipped in soy or served with rice porridge, are more than breakfast – for Jean Trinh and her family, they're a symbol of resilience.

* * *

How Carla Ching tells a 'complex, nuanced' story about betrayal, revenge porn in new play
In Carla Ching's play Revenge Porn, leading character Kat Chan has to decide how she'll respond to her ex-husband releasing nude photographs of her.

* * *

Hasan Minhaj Confronts His Own Clout-Chasing and the One Thing He Has in Common With the Crown Prince
Comedian Hasan Minhaj, whose last Netflix foray was censored after Saudi objections, reflects on his decidedly more personal stand-up special, The King's Jester, ahead of its premiere on the streamer.

* * *

How Ali Wong Helped Make Her 'Favorite' Comedian Sheng Wang a Netflix Star
Stand-up comedian Sheng Wang tells The Last Laugh podcast how his friend Ali Wong directed him to new comedic heights in his first hour-long Netflix special Sweet and Juicy.

* * *

James Wong Howe's Way with Light
"Wong Howe's path through Hollywood was not always easy, but in his best work he found a voice that was inimitably his own, imbued with the vulnerability and longing of an outsider trying to find his place in the world."


9.30.2022

173: They Call Us Tanuj Chopra

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome back friend and filmmaker Tanuj Chopra, who directed season two of the Netflix series Delhi Crime. He talks about making the leap from indie films to international television, bringing an insider/outsider perspective to get the tone right, and the future of global storytelling.

9.26.2022

Sacred Book Honors Japanese Americans Incarcerated During World War II

The Ireichō is on display at the Japanese American National Museum.



Over the weekend in Los Angeles, the Japanese American National Museum invited the public to view and sign the Ireichō, a sacred book that records -- for the first time ever -- the names of over 125,000 persons of Japanese ancestry who were unjustly imprisoned in U.S. Army, Department of Justice, and War Relocation Authority camps during World War II.

Visitors were invited to view the names and use a special Japanese hanko to leave a mark for each person in the Ireichō as a way to honor those incarcerated during World War II. Community participation will "activate" it and rectify the historical record by correcting misspelled names or revealing names that may have been omitted from the record.

The Ireichō will be on display at JANM for one year. A companion virtual monument is available online.

More here: 'There’s our family name': Sacred book honors Japanese Americans incarcerated during WWII


9.25.2022

Read These



How Constance Wu Survived That Tweetstorm
In Constance Wu's new book, Making a Scene, the former Fresh Off the Boat star reveals her isolation, racism in her career -- and yes, those tweets -- and how she's moving on.

* * *

At Gracepoint Ministries, 'Whole-Life Discipleship' Took Its Toll
As Gracepoint Ministries, a predominantly Asian American church network, expands to dozens of college towns, former members come forward with claims of spiritual abuse.

* * *

New laws address anti-Asian hate in the long-term, but what about feeling safe right now?
This month, California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed two bills seeking to address harassment on public transit and in businesses. Meanwhile, the Citizen personal safety app announced it was providing up to 20,000 Asian Americans in the Bay Area with a free one-year subscription. Both try to address anti-Asian hate, but their differences illustrate the complexity of the issue.

* * *

Talking about substance use can be hard for Filipino Americans. Why it's helpful to share stories
Honest conversations about substance abuse disorders and mental health can be difficult for some Filipino families.

* * *

Hua Hsu on His New Memoir, 'Stay True'
Hua Hsu's new memoir is both a coming-of-age story and an evolutionary step for Asian American literature.

* * *

The Stakes of Dictee
An introduction to Theresa Hak Kyung Cha's famously difficult work.

* * *

Watching Spirited Away Again, and Again
For Nina Li Coomes, each viewing of Miyazaki's animated feature Spirited Away is a gift.

* * *

"The Field Is Open": Ocean Vuong on Minari's Lasting Cultural Legacy
Ocean Vuong, author of On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous, reflects on the history of Asian American farmers in an original essay from A24's Minari screenplay book.


9.23.2022

They Call Us Bruce 172: They Call Us Yuji Okumoto

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome actor Yuji Okumoto, who stars in season five of Netflix's Cobra Kai as Chozen Toguchi, the role he originated in 1986's The Karate Kid Pt. II. He talks about stepping back into the Karate Kid Cinematic Universe, his (and ours, and everybody's) love for Kumiko, and getting an unexpected redemption arc for his character over thirty years later. This episode is paid for by the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. Find boosters near you at vaccines.gov.

9.20.2022

Kelly Marie Tran to Star in Biopic on Activist Amanda Nguyen

Nguyen founded the non-profit organization Rise, dedicated to furthering the rights of sexual assault survivors.



Kelly Marie Tran is developing a biopic about her friend, civil rights activist Amanda Nguyen, telling the story of her transformation from a survivor of college sexual assault to an activist for survivors' rights.

Tran will star in and produce the biopic about Nguyen, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee who founded civil rights accelerator Rise and wrote the Survivor's Bill Of Rights, which inspired the federal law passed in 2016.

“Over the years, Amanda's activism has changed the lives of billions, as she continues to make our world safer for sexual assault survivors everywhere,” Tran said in a statement. "Her courage inspires me every day, and I am honored to help tell her story."

Tang Yi is in talks to write and direct the film, which is in the early stages of development.

More here: Kelly Marie Tran to Star in, Produce Biopic on Activist Amanda Nguyen


New Documentary Revisits the Legend of Linsanity

'38 at the Garden' premieres October 11 on HBO.



I'll always remember the night Jeremy Lin dropped a stunning 38 points on the Lakers at Madison Square Garden. A new documentary short, 38 at the Garden, chronicles the extraordinary ascendance of your favorite Asian American point guard during his landmark 2012 season with the New York Knicks -- the period that affectionately became known as "Linsanity." You know the story. But I'll never get tired of it.

A decade later, Lin's stature as a groundbreaking, cultural icon stands in stark relief to the recent hate crimes against the Asian American and Pacific Islander community. 38 at the Garden recognizes a pivotal moment in time for Lin and celebrates a phenomenon that was bigger than basketball for the world. The film features a candid, new interview with Lin, as well as journalists Lisa Ling and Pablo Torre, comedians Ronny Chieng, Hasan Minhaj and Jenny Yang, and Knicks teammates Tyson Chandler and Iman Shumpert.

Here's the trailer:

9.19.2022

Wakaji Matsumoto — An Artist in Two Worlds: Los Angeles and Hiroshima, 1917–1944

Online exhibition at the Japanese American National Museum



Wakaji Matsumoto — An Artist in Two Worlds: Los Angeles and Hiroshima, 1917–1944 is an online exhibition and public program about an artist and pioneer in Pictorialism who documented the lives of Japanese immigrant farmers in rural Los Angeles during the early 1900s and created rare images of urban life in Hiroshima prior to the 1945 atomic bombing of the city.

The online exhibition, presented by the Japanese American National Museum, highlights rarely seen early photographs of Los Angeles prior to World War II and of Hiroshima before the U.S. dropped the atomic bomb through the single lens of photographer Wakaji Matsumoto.

"Wakaji Matsumoto's photographs of farms that were operated by Japanese Americans in the Los Angeles area demonstrate the difficult life of Japanese Americans and their resolve and resilience," says Dennis Reed, the curator of the exhibition. "His photographs of Hiroshima are the largest-known photographic archive of the city prior to the atomic bomb. Today, our knowledge of the city's horrific fate lends a pall of melancholy over these tender images. They bear the weight of history."

View the online exhibition here: janm.org/exhibits/wakaji-matsumoto

Eugene Cordero Upped to Series Regular on 'Loki'

He played Time Variance Authority employee Casey in season one.



Eugene Cordero has been reportedly promoted to series regular on season two of Marvel's Loki. Cordero played the Time Variance Authority employee "Casey" in the first season of the Disney+ series. He only made a handful of appearances on the show, so it's pretty cool to see him make the jump to a bigger role.

Eugene is one of my favorite actors working today. If you don't know him from, say, his fan-favorite role as "Pillboi" on The Good Place, you've probably seen him in a dozen other things, including Easter Sunday, The Mandalorian, Kong: Skull Island, Tacoma FD, and The Good Place, to name a few.

More here: 'Loki': Eugene Cordero Upped To Series Regular For Season 2


Judge Overturns Murder Conviction of Adnan Syed of 'Serial'

Syed has been in prison for 23 years for the murder of high school classmate Hae Min Lee.



Adnan Syed, whose case was chronicled by the popular podcast Serial, was released from prison Monday after spending 23 years behind bars on charges that he murdered his former high school girlfriend.

Judge Melissa M. Phinn of Baltimore City Circuit Court overturned Syed's murder conviction in the 1999 killing of Hae Min Lee, finding that prosecutors had failed to turn over evidence that could have helped Syed at trial and discovered new evidence that could have affected the outcome of his case.

The office of the State's Attorney for Baltimore City said in a motion filed last week that there was new information about two potential alternative suspects in the homicide. While prosecutors aren't saying Syed is innocent, they are saying they lack confidence in "the integrity of the conviction."

Prosecutors have 30 days to decide if they will proceed with a new trial or drop the charges against Syed, who was ordered to serve home detention until then.

More here: Judge Vacates Murder Conviction of Adnan Syed of 'Serial'


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9.18.2022

Read These



Inside the forgotten story of the Chinatown mothers who mobilized during the Boston busing crisis
Boston's 1970s busing crisis typically has been cast as a Black and white struggle. What is less known is how Chinese immigrant women organized a three-day school boycott that changed Chinatown for decades to come.

* * *

As anti-Asian bigotry rises across the U.S., a Temple professor’s civil rights suit becomes more relevant
Xiaoxing Xi, a Temple University physics professor who was falsely accused of spying for China, filed a discrimination lawsuit against the U.S. government in 2017. The case was dismissed. Xi was back in court Wednesday to get his lawsuit reinstated.

* * *

Why Yuh-Line Niou Didn't Run Again
Yuh-Line Niou lost her re-election campaign by a narrow margin. While her supporters hoped she would run in the general election on a third-party ticket, she gave a rundown of reasons why she won't be challenging Dan Goldman this election cycle.

* * *

'They Break Up Families' — Crypto Scam Leaves Lasting Scars for Atlanta's Korean Community
A multimillion-dollar cryptocurrency scam targeted Atlanta's Korean community, reflecting a national trend that targets immigrant communities.

* * *

She Fought Racism in Early Hollywood. Now She'll Be the First Asian American on US Currency
Sixty years after her death, Anna May Wong's legacy lives on in film and fashion. Now her contributions will be honored by one of the most quintessentially American symbols: the quarter.

* * *

Meet the cookbook author who's bringing Taiwanese-American flavors to cannabis edibles
From coffee jelly to snowflake crisp nougat, Monica Lo explores her heritage through culinary cannabis.

* * *

Making a Netflix Rom-Com That's a Trojan Horse for Exploring “Structural Racism and Sexism"
Georgia Lee, showrunner of Netflix's Partner Track discusses how she used the rom-com genre to tell a different story about race, gender, love and the workplace.

* * *

'She-Hulk' Actor Benedict Wong Talks Living in the "Wong Cinematic Universe"
With several appearances across the MCU's Phase 4, Wong has become a fan-favorite character. Most recently, the Sorcerer Supreme, played by Benedict Wong, joins the Disney+ series She-Hulk: Attorney at Law.


9.16.2022

They Call Us Bruce 171: They Call Us Jamie Ford

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome bestselling author Jamie Ford, whose latest novel The Many Daughters of Afong Moy is described as an "epigenetic love story." He talks about the tragic real life of the first Chinese woman in America, weaving the intricate story of her imagined descendants, and exploring (and perhaps overcoming) inherited intergenerational trauma. This episode is paid for by the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. Find boosters near you at vaccines.gov.

9.12.2022

Read These



Indiana Jones and Short Round reunite after 38 years
Actors Harrison Ford and Ke Huy Quan, who starred together in 1984's Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, reunited over the weekend at D23 -- hugging it out for an instantly iconic photo.

* * *

In Orange County, a House Race Is Testing What Asian Americans Want
In politically competitive Orange County, two Asian American candidates are facing off for the support of the growing Asian American electorate.

* * *

A racial reckoning over a festival’s disrespect toward Asians in Monterey Bay
For decades, the city of Pacific Grove, California -- a predominantly white city of about 15,000 -- would celebrate its annual "Feast of Lanterns," a faux-Asian festival that used dated stereotypes and appropriated Chinese culture. The city announced it was ending the event earlier this year.

* * *

Meet the Moms Who Are Fighting Anti-Asian Hate
As anti-Asian hate rages across the nation, moms are taking a stand. But the fight isn't new.

* * *

Comedian Jenny Yang's Food Education Campaign Asks Goop to Rethink MSG Messaging
Comedian Jenny Yang's latest collaborative food education campaign, held in conjunction with MSG-producing company Ajinomoto, redefines "clean eating" and constructively calls Goop, Gwyneth Paltrow's wellness platform, to action.

* * *

Karen O Has Found a More Joyful Kind of Wildness
Yeah Yeah Yeahs front woman Karen O talks about recording the band's new album Cool It Down, becoming a mother, and meeting other rock stars who look like her.

* * *

How Younghoe Koo overcame a language barrier and being cut to thrive in the NFL
From not knowing any English to becoming a starter, Atlanta Falcons kicker Younghoe Koo is one of the most improbable success stories of the National Football League.

9.08.2022

All The Asians On Star Trek 29: Kathryn Lyn

The Podcast In Which We Interview All The Asians On Star Trek.



All The Asians On Star Trek is the podcast in which we interview all the Asians on Star Trek. In Episode 29, we welcome Kathryn Lyn, who has worn several hats in Star Trek writers rooms, including as a writer/producer on Star Trek: Lower Decks and Star Trek: Strange New Worlds. She also officially serves as Canon Consultant on Lower Decks, making her the go-to geek when the writers have deep-cut canon questions. She talks about her journey as a writer, her favorite episodes, and the tattoo that got her a job on Star Trek.

8.28.2022

Read These



What Can Bruce Lee Tell Us About Our Contemporary World?
Daryl Joji Maeda on how the historical and political forces of the late 20th century made a cinematic icon.

* * *

For 'disabled oracle' Alice Wong, rest is a radical act
Alice Wong, founder and director of the Disability Visibility Project, titled her memoir Year of the Tiger: An Activist's Life, as a nod to her Chinese zodiac animal sign.

* * *

A Chinatown Boy Scout troop has endured against all odds for 108 years. Can it survive today?
Founded in 1914, Troop 3, based in San Francisco's Chinatown, is believed to be the oldest Boy Scout troop west of the Mississippi.

* * *

'If You Can Make a Salad, You Can Make Kimchi'
Kimjang, the act of preparing kimchi, allows Koreans of the diaspora to keep the tradition alive -- and invites everyone to join.

* * *

'Industry' Star Ken Leung on Eric's Big Promotion and Navigating the Show's Financial Jargon
Ken Leung, who plays volatile boss Eric Tao in HBO's financial drama Industry, talks about showing a more vulnerable side to his character in Season 2, and how he wraps his brain around the show's dense finance-speak.

* * *

What Arden Cho Learned About Speaking Up: "I Was Taught Not to Rock the Boat"
How Arden Cho risked her career over her pay inequity dispute and found a role on the Netflix law firm drama Partner Track.

* * *

Shefali Shah, Tanuj Chopra On DCP Vartika’s Journey, Tackling Social Issues And Pandemic Impact In 'Delhi Crime' Season 2
"They came for the crime but stayed for the characters." The Indian crime drama Delhi Crime returns to Netflix for a second season, with Shefali Shah back as DCP Vartika Chaturvedi and U.S.-based indie filmmaker Tanuj Chopra on board as showrunner and director.


8.26.2022

They Call Us Bruce 170: They Call Us Partner Track

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome Arden Cho, star of Partner Track, and Helen Wan, author of the original book that inspired the Netflix series. They discuss Helen's real-life career as a corporate attorney that inspired the novel, how Ingrid Yung became Ingrid Yun, and the convergence of timing and talent that finally made this adaptation possible. This episode is paid for by the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. Find boosters near you at vaccines.gov.

8.21.2022

Read These



My Dad and Kurt Cobain
When Hua Hsu's father moved to Taiwan, a fax machine and a shared love of music bridged an ocean.

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An L.A. mob once massacred 18 Chinese people. Now, a push to never forget the racist assault
More than 150 years after racist mob violence claimed the lives of 18 Chinese people in Los Angeles' Chinatown, city officials have put out a public call for ideas to memorialize this mostly forgotten moment in history.

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How Japanese American Incarceration Was Entangled With Indigenous Dispossession
"Until recently, Japanese American incarceration and American Indian dispossession have often been treated as unrelated discussions. In reality, different oppressions reinforce and bolster one another."

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Japanese American Incarceration for Children: Brandon Shimoda on Reading with His Daughter
“I did not grow up with children's books about Japanese American incarceration. There were not many."

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‘Pachinko’ author Min Jin Lee on wrapping up trilogy about Korean life
A Q&A with Min Jin Lee on writing, activism and anti-Asian violence.

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The Year of Michelle Yeoh
She’s been a beauty queen and an action hero, but now with the awards buzz of Everything Everywhere All at Once and that Avatar sequel on the horizon, Michelle Yeoh finds herself at the zenith of the Hollywood firmament. It’s no surprise if you've been paying attention.

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Aklasan Fest, the only Filipino punk festival in the U.S., celebrates its return
Featuring 15 bands from across the country, Aklasan Festival in San Francisco is the only Filipino punk festival of its kind, prioritizing the often unheard and unseen voices of punk.

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‘Easter Sunday’ Writer Ken Cheng on How He Celebrated Filipino Culture Through the Film's Comedy
Easter Sunday screenwriter Ken Cheng details how he told a culturally specific story with universal appeal and the film's wild journey to the screen.


8.19.2022

They Call Us Bruce 169: They Call Us Free Chol Soo Lee

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome Julie Ha and Eugene Yi, directors of the documentary Free Chol Soo Lee, which tells the story of a community's landmark fight to free an innocent man. They discuss the important legacy of the case, why they were compelled to shine a light on this singular moment, the generational responsibility of unearthing our stories. This episode is paid for by the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. Find boosters near you at vaccines.gov.

8.17.2022

They Call Us Bruce 168: They Call Us Wesley Chu

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, recorded live at Vroman's Bookstore in Pasadena, we welcome novelist Wesley Chu, author of the epic fantasy The Art of Prophecy. He talks about writing fight scenes, allowing his characters to do what they want to do, and why this wuxia-inspired novel is the story he's been wanting to tell his whole life. This episode is paid for by the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. Find boosters near you at vaccines.gov.

8.14.2022

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Racist and sexist disinformation is sowing divisions among Asian Americans
A new report spotlights how disinformation not only pits Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders against other marginalized groups but also sows divisions within the community itself, sometimes to intentionally diminish its collective political influence.

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The New York Times’s Interview With Yuh-Line Niou
Yuh-Line Niou is a state assemblywoman in New York's 65th District, representing parts of Lower Manhattan since 2017. She is running for the U.S. House of Representatives in New York's newly drawn 10th district.

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Yuh-Line Niou on Her Especially Personal Run for Congress
From representation to disability policy, she says there’s a common theme: Courage.

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Asian American Voters Rallied for Democrats in 2020. Will They Again?
The Democratic party confronts a mood of frustration among the rising electoral force that helped vault it to power. The campaign in Georgia will test that bond.

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Big projects like the Sixers’ arena plan have often threatened Philly’s Chinatown. But the AAPI community always fights for the neighborhood.
For 150 years, Philadelphia's Chinatown community has fought for its life as big development project after project has targeted the neighborhood, threatening not only its existence but its unique authenticity -- most recently with the 76ers’ proposal for a new arena in the neighborhood.

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My ICU Summer: A Photo Essay
Alice Wong’s months in the ICU highlights the steep costs of medical care for disabled individuals and their families due to a broken healthcare system.

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A New Documentary Sheds Light on a Pivotal Movement in Asian American History
Social justice activism in the Asian American community today owes much of its legacy to the pivotal case of Chol Soo Lee, whose heartbreaking, remarkable, and undeniably complex story is the subject of a new documentary.

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The Metamorphosis of Mindy Kaling
Starting with her rise to fame on The Office to now creating some of streaming’s biggest hits, the actress, writer, and producer has transformed Hollywood. But her most fulfilling project yet is happening behind the scenes—as a mother, mentor, and mogul.

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Sujata Day on Her Search For Samosas As Good As Mom’s
Director and writer Sujata Day recalls a restaurant in L.A. she yearns for the most.


8.12.2022

They Call Us Bruce 167: They Call Us Yuh-Line Niou

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome congressional candidate Yuh-Line Niou, who is running for the House of Representatives in New York's newly drawn 10th district. She talks about truly representational politics, making the legislative process more accessible for all, and The Good, The Bad and The WTF of running for congress. This episode is paid for by the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. Find boosters near you at vaccines.gov.

8.10.2022

They Call Us Bruce 166: They Call Us Katherine J. Wu

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome journalist Katherine J. Wu, who covers science as staff writer for The Atlantic. She talks about joining science with storytelling, where we went wrong (and right) with our collective pandemic response, and the most erroneous assumptions we're making about COVID right now. This episode is paid for by the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. Find boosters near you at vaccines.gov.

8.07.2022

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What It Means to Be Asian in America
In a new Pew Research Center analysis based on dozens of focus groups, Asian American participants described the challenges of navigating their identity in a nation where the label "Asian" brings expectations about their origins, behavior and physical self.

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How a tiny Chinatown bookstore became a hub for authentic Asian American stories
Yu and Me Books, the first Asian American female-owned bookstore in New York, highlights titles from immigrants and people of color, with a special focus on Asian Americans.

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To 'Free Chol Soo Lee,' Asian Americans had to find their collective political voice
NPR talks to Julie Ha, co-director of the new documentary Free Chol Soo Lee, which tells the story of a 20-year-old Korean American man imprisoned for a murder he did not commit -- a case that became a pivotal moment for the Asian American community.

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Jo Koy's 'Easter Sunday' puts Filipinos front and center
Comedian Jo Koy stars in Easter Sunday, the first big studio movie with an all-Filipino ensemble.

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Tia Carrere in "Easter Sunday" Marks a Profound Change for Filipinos in Hollywood
Tia Carrere, who cemented herself in Hollywood three decades ago as the iconic Cassandra Wong in Wayne's World, appears in the family comedy Easter Sunday -- the first time in her prolific, 30-year-plus career that she is playing a Filipino.

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Nobody wanted to make 'Squid Game.' Now it’s making history
For a very long time, no one wanted to make Squid Game. Now it has 14 Emmy nominations.

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Paper Girls Star Ali Wong on Comics, Erin's Journey, and Her Childhood Dreams
Ali Wong, who stars as adult Erin in the series Paper Girls, talks about her relationship with the Paper Girls comic book, the dynamic between the two Erins, and her childhood dreams.

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88Rising's NIKI is Owning Her PAST - and Taking a Cue from Taylor Swift
Filled with reproduced and never-before-heard music, NIKI's second album is an exploration of her start in the industry -- and a taste of where she wants to go from here.