3.19.2023

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No, my Japanese American parents were not 'interned' during WWII. They were incarcerated
The Los Angeles Times officially halts the use of the word "internment" to describe the mass incarceration of 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry during World War II.

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What counts as an 'American name' in a changing nation
The Washington Post's Marian Chia-Ming Liu asked readers if they felt the need to Anglicize their names to fit in. She showcases just a few of the thousands of responses she received.

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'RRR's' 'Naatu Naatu' made Oscars history. But South Asian dancers feel betrayed
After a milestone night for Asian and Asian American inclusion at the 95th Academy Awards, the South Asian community is still feeling the sting of being left out of the live performance of "Naatu Naatu."

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Why 'Everything Everywhere All At Once' feels more like reality than movie magic
"I'll admit, this movie is a family hot pot of ridiculousness... But even though my friends have described me as cold-hearted and the Grumpy Cat meme in real life, I was unexpectedly emotional while watching it."

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For Asian Americans, thrill of Oscars offset by rising anti-Asian hate
The historic success of Everything Everywhere All At Once comes almost a year after the Atlanta spa shooting, with anti-Asian attacks still on the rise.

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Ke Huy Quan, Comeback Kid: The Oscar Winner on 'Everything Everywhere,' Kissing Harrison Ford and Why He's Worried About What Comes Next
Comeback kid Ke Huy Quan talks to Variety in the aftermath of his amazing, inspirational Oscar win.

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Joy Ride: Adele Lim on Her SXSW Directorial Debut and Telling a Story About Messy, Thirsty Friends 'On Our Terms'
Teresa Hsiao, Cherry Chevapravatdumrong, and Adele Lim wanted a film that showed young Asian women having fun and being messy, telling a story on their own terms. Joy Ride follows a young woman who goes on a business trip to Asia and decides to track down her birth mother while she's there.


3.12.2023

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‘Everything Everywhere All at Once' Is Big Winner at the Oscars
In a historic night at the 95th Academy Awards, Everything Everywhere All at Once won seven awards, including for best picture, original screenplay, directing and in three of the four acting categories.

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Everything Everywhere's James Hong on bullying, 'yellowface' and his big break – at 94
He has worked with everyone from Clark Gable to Harrison Ford. Now the actor is finally getting the attention he deserves. He talks about hidden prejudice, tickling Kim Cattrall -- and his dreams for the future.

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Stephanie Hsu feels at peace with the multiverse
The Everything Everywhere All At Once breakout star and Oscar nominee talks the film, her career thus far, and the magnitude of this moment.

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For us weird Asians, 'Everything Everywhere All at Once' is a second chance
Jeff Yang knew of the strange, obscure, and absurd stories out there in Asian American indie film, but was shocked by the impact Everything Everywhere All at Once has had at the big box office.

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The Oscars and the Pitfalls of Feel-Good Representation
Why have we become so fixated on the award prospects of the most successful members of a minority group?

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'She had to hide': the secret history of the first Asian woman nominated for a best actress Oscar
Merle Oberon, a pick for best actress in 1936, was born in Bombay and spent her career passing for white.

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What I Found When I Looked Into the Fate of Anna May Wong, a Hollywood Star
"There is a platitude that has often been repeated in recent years: You can't be what you can't see. These Asian pioneers in cinema prove the contrary. They were each firsts in their own right, pushing forward where there were no trails to follow."

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The Family Who Tried to End Racism Through Adoption
Bob and Sheryl Guterl saw their family as a kind of "ark for the age of the nuclear bomb" and attempted to gather "two of every race."

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A Photographer Frames His Own American South
Tommy Kha's portraits blend his Asian heritage with the mythology of the South.

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The PEN Ten: An Interview with Monica Youn
In her fourth poetry collection, From From, poet Monica Youn explores Asian American identity existing in the space between a homeland and a country of residence/citizenship.


3.10.2023

They Call Us Bruce 190: They Call Us Unseen

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome Yoko Okumura, Midori Francis and Jolene Purdy, the director and stars, respectively, of the horror/thriller Unseen. They discuss the challenges of crafting a story about two people connecting via FaceTime; the unique storytelling dynamic that occurs when a movie, not originally conceived as an Asian American story, is told by a director and two leads who happen to be Japanese American; And The Good, The Bad, and The WTF of making Unseen (hint: involves bugs).

3.05.2023

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'I Don't Take a Single Second for Granted': Asian and Asian American Nominees on the Oscars
It was a record year for actors, but directors, musicians and other artists of Asian descent are also up for statuettes. We asked many of the contenders to reflect on their work.

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Asian Actors Have Been Underrepresented at the Oscars For Decades. Here's the History.
A record number of actors of Asian ancestry were recognized with Oscar nominations this year, led by Michelle Yeoh of Everything Everywhere All at Once, who's up for best actress. Historically, Asian stars have rarely been part of the Academy Awards.

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Hong Kong's Ageless Action Hero
Nearing 60, Donnie Yen, the last of a golden era of martial arts stars, looks back on an unparalleled career—and forward, to his role in the new John Wick film.

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Why Everyone Will Be Talking About Steven Yeun's New Netflix Series
Steven Yeun plays a smolderingly angry, increasingly desperate general contractor in the new Netflix dark comedy Beef.

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Ali Wong Gets Dramatic
Boundary-pushing stand-up Ali Wong tests her limits with an intense part on Netflix's Beef and a new real-life role as a divorced mom: "Whatever happens, I'm in my first trimester of life right now."

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Hari Kondabolu on Comedy, Race, and Being a Queens Kid in Maine
Comedian Hari Kondabolu talks about seeing space for himself on the screen, discovering how to be in the world and the first joke he was really proud of.

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How 'Unseen' Director Yoko Okumura Cast Against the Hollywood Grain in Debut Film
Yoko Okumura's feature-length directorial debut Unseen is about a women who is kidnapped by her obsessive boyfriend and held captive in the woods.

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With Turning Red, Domee Shi Explores Uncharted Animated Waters
Domee Shi, director of Pixar's Turning Red, on the joys -- and weight -- of being a trailblazer.

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Kung Fu Nuns of Nepal Smash Convention
In Himalayan Buddhism, the religious roles of nuns have long been restricted by rules and customs. But one sect is changing that, mixing meditation with martial arts and environmental activism.


3.03.2023

They Call Us Bruce 189: They Call Us Everything Everywhere All at Once Again

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we revisit the film Everything Everywhere All at Once, now in the thick of awards season and on the cusp of Oscars glory, with an epic super-sized compilation of our previous conversations with Ke Huy Quan, Stephanie Hsu, Daniel Kwan, and of course, Michelle Yeoh -- who now all happen to be Academy Award nominees.

2.26.2023

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Randall Park Breaks Out of Character
Randall Park made his career in amiable roles like Louis on Fresh Off the Boat, but his directorial d├ębut, Shortcomings, is full of characters who are, in his word, "shitty" people.

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Schools unprepared to help Asian American students navigate racial trauma
Amid recent high-profile attacks and the larger surge in anti-Asian hate, young Asian Americans -- for whom the leading cause of death was suicide even prior to the pandemic -- are calling on schools to invest in the sustained mental health resources they need to cope.

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Stephanie Hsu on Lessons Learned from Michelle Yeoh and Ke Huy Quan
Actress Stephanie Hsu dishes on her Academy Award nomination for Everything Everywhere All at Once, lessons learned from her veteran co-stars and being a future bingo night winner.

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She’s Oscar-Nominated, but Hong Chau Hopes to Stay an Underdog
Nominated for best supporting actress for The Whale, actress Hong Chau never dreamed of being a performer. But she has turned into a force of nature," says co-star Brendan Fraser.

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'Everything Everywhere' Producer Jonathan Wang Unlocks the Secret of the Daniels' Success
Oscar nominated producer Jonathan Wang explains how he became the "third leg" of the Daniels and why the success of Everything Everywhere should be seen as a counterpoint to Top Gun: Maverick.

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For a Film About Korean Adoptees, a Group Effort
In Return to Seoul, a French adoptee repeatedly visits her birth country of South Korea. Neither filmmaker Davy Chou nor star Park Ji-Min were adopted, but they got help from friends.

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How 'Physical 100,' Netflix's Korean reality gauntlet, destroys misconceptions around Asian bodies
"The major contribution here is that it completely destabilizes the ways we link up race and ability."

2.22.2023

Greta Lee and Teo Yoo Star in A24's 'Past Lives'

Celine Song's decades-spanning romantic drama premiered to rave reviews at the Sundance Film Festival.



Damn, that's a hell of a trailer. Here's your first look at Past Lives, writer/director Celine Song's decades-spanning romantic drama starring Greta Lee, Teo Yoo, and John Magaro. The film premiered to rave reviews at the Sundance Film Festival is scheduled for release this year.

Past Lives follows Nora and Hae Sung, two deeply connected childhood friends, are wrest apart after Nora’s family emigrates from South Korea. Two decades later, they are reunited in New York for one fateful week as they confront notions of destiny, love, and the choices that make a life, in this heartrending modern romance.

Take a look:

A24 is Auctioning Off (Almost) Everything from Everything Everywhere All At Once

Online charitable auction featuring original and iconic props, wardrobe, and set pieces.



If you're an Everything Everywhere All at Once superfan like me, you can't get enough of Daniels' multiverse jumping sci-fi action adventure comedy. But how about owning an actual piece from the movie?

A24's online charitable auction platform A24 Auctions is offering fans a chance to own a piece of movie history. Starting Thursday, February 23, 12:00 PM (ET), you can bid on the original and iconic props, wardrobe, and set pieces from Everything Everywhere All at Once. How about Jobu Tapaki's bedazzled Elvis costume? Hot dog hands? Racacoonie? The Auditor of the Month trophy? Yup.

100% of each of the auction's proceeds will be donated to one of the three charities that filmmakers The Daniels selected: Laundry Workers Center, Transgender Law Center and Asian Mental Health Project.


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