Angry Reader of the Week: Jimmy O. Yang

"...better to disappoint my parents for a couple of years than to disappoint myself for the rest of my life."

Good people of the internet! It is time to meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Jimmy O. Yang.

Interior Secretary's response to hearing about Japanese American incarceration: "Konnichiwa"

Rep. Colleen Hanabusa was not amused.

"Konnichiwa." Wow. So you know one fucking Japanese word. Slow clap.

It's one thing -- annoying as shit -- when some fool tries to bust one of these on you in a bar or on the street. (Asian folk, raise your hand if you've been on the receiving end of an unsolicited "konnichiwa" or a "ni hao.") It's wholly inappropriate when it happens during a hearing of the United States Congress.

But that's what happened Thursday during a hearing of the House Committee on Natural Resources. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa (D-Hawaii), who is Japanese American, was pressing Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke about re-funding a National Park Service program that offers grants towards the preservation of incarceration sites where Japanese Americans -- including Hanabusa's grandparents -- were held during World War II.

"Are you committed to continue to grant programs that are identified, I believe, as the Japanese American Confinement Sites grants program which were funded in 2017? Will we see them funded again in 2018?" Hanabusa asked.

Zinke's response: "Oh, konnichiwa."

I imagine Rep. Hanabusa had to summon every molecule of her being to suppress an eye roll.


Explore Bruce Lee's Seattle legacy in 'A Dragon Lives Here'

Now open at the Wing Luke Museum in Seattle

Bruce fans, get yourself to Seattle. The multi-year Do You Know Bruce? exhibition series at the Wing Luke Museum provides fresh and untold perspectives on Bruce Lee's life and his connection to Seattle. Part 4, A Dragon Lives Here, focuses on the martial arts icon's close local ties.

Bruce Lee spent some of his most formative years in Seattle -- learning English, attending university, meeting his future wife, and establishing his first martial arts studio. In this all-new exhibit, retrace Seattle locales special to Bruce Lee and get an up-close look at how this city also shaped his trailblazing approach.

"Bruce Lee is part of Seattle's legacy of entrepreneurship and innovation," says comedian and host of CNN's United Shades of America (and professed Bruce Lee superfan) W. Kamau Bell, who is featured in the museum's intro video for A Dragon Lives Here. "They may not know it yet, but they will: a dragon lives here."

Kelly Marie Tran takes a bite out of this Star Wars deleted scene

Leaked 'Last Jedi' deleted scene leaves Rose Tico with a bad taste in her mouth.

If you were dying to see more of Kelly Marie Tran as Rose Tico in Star Wars: The Last Jedi, here you go. In this deleted scene from the upcoming DVD release, leaked from what appears to be a Korean subtitled version, we see Rose and Finn on their knees, captured by the First Order. What we didn't see in the theatrical cut: Rose taking a big ol' bite out of General Hux's gloved finger when he gets a little too close.

"Go back to your home country."

Golden West College faculty member placed on leave after being caught on camera making a racist remark.

Because you never know when you're gonna need it. Protip: in case of sudden, unexpected racist public encounters, always keep your camera ready to catch that shit go down. A Southern California college professor was recently caught on camera telling an Asian American couple to "go back to your home country."

58-year-old Tarin Olson, a teacher and counselor at Golden West College in Huntington Beach, California, was filmed telling Tony Kao and his wife that they should "go back to your home country" while they were walking in Long Beach. They were apparently on a neighborhood stroll with their baby when Olson just "nonchalantly" offered them this unwelcome advice, without provocation, as she was passing them on the sidewalk.

Kao says this wasn't their first encounter with Olson, only this time they heard her clearly.

"A few weeks back we believed we walked past the same lady and also heard her mumble something to that effect but ignored it and thought we misheard," Kao shared in a March 1 Facebook post that has since gone viral. "But this time as she walked away, I yelled to her, 'WHAT YOU SAY?'

Kao's wife recorded part of their interaction. As you can see, once Olson realizes they've got a camera on her, she tries to get the fuck out of there. But not before telling them, again, where to go.

Gunman kills three in deadly veterans home standoff

Former patient Albert Wong took several hostages before killing himself and three employees.

A former soldier and former patient of a veterans home in California took three employees hostage on Friday in a seven-hour standoff before authorities found him and three mental health professionals dead.

Gunman, 3 Hostages Dead At Veterans Home North Of San Francisco

Authorities say 36-year-old Albert Wong, armed with a rifle, burst into a morning gathering at the Veterans Home of California-Yountville, a treatment facility for elderly or disabled veterans. He took five hostages after exchanging gunfire with a Napa County sheriff's deputy. He later released two hostages.

When police stormed the facility hours later, they found Wong dead, along with three of home's employees, 42-year-old Clinical Director Jennifer Golick, 48-year-old Executive Director Christine Loeber, and 29-year-old Clinical Psychologist Jennifer Gonzalez -- all fatally shot.


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Angry Reader of the Week: Andrew Ti

"Definitely read all questions ahead of time before starting."

Hey, folks! Here's what's up. It's time for the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Andrew Ti.


Chloe Kim is getting her own Barbie doll

Barbie's new "Shero" line celebrates modern-day role models from around the world.

Olympic snowboarding gold medalist Chloe Kim, still radiating awesomeness from her dominating, inspirational halfpipe win at the PyeongChang Winter Games, is being honored with a Barbie doll in her likeness.

The doll is part of Barbie's "Shero" program, unveiled ahead of International Women's Day on March 8 and honoring modern-day role models from around the world.

The Chloe Kim doll bears a striking resemblance to the teen snowboarder, right down to the shade of her signature blond locks. She comes equipped with, of course, a snowboard and looks appropriately outfitted for a championship halfpipe run... but does she come with a gold medal too?


Broadway star Ruthie Ann Miles injured, 4-year-old daughter killed in car crash

A car ran a red light and drove through a crowd of people in Brooklyn.

Tony Award-winning Broadway actress Ruthie Ann Miles was in critical condition Monday after she was struck by a car in Brooklyn in an accident that killed her 4-year-old daughter and another child.

Tony Award-Winning Actress Hurt in Deadly Wreck After Driver Blows Red Light in Brooklyn

Miles was walking with a friend, Lauren Lew, and their kids in Park Slope when a white Volvo reportedly ran a red light, drove through the intersection and plowed through a crowd of people in the crosswalk. Miles and Lew were both injured in the crash. Miles' 4-year-old daughter Abigail and Lew's 1-year-old son Joshua were killed. A fifth victim, a 46-year-old man, was also hit.

Miles, who is currently expecting her second child, was critically injured but listed in stable condition.


Kelly Marie Tran got mistaken for Mirai Nagasu at the Oscars

Getty Images apparently can't distinguish between two totally different Asian ladies in blue-ish dresses.

On Sunday night, Star Wars: The Last Jedi star Kelly Marie Tran made her debut on the Oscars red carpet, looking hot as hell in a stunning blue Jenny Packham gown. Looking awesome... then promptly misidentified as another Asian American woman on the red carpet, Olympic figure skater Mirai Nagasu. Oops.

All Look Same strikes again. It seems that whoever was on caption-writing duty at Getty Images, one of the world's leading photo agencies, had some trouble distinguishing between two totally different Asian ladies in blue-ish dresses, misidentifying Tran as Nagasu, and vice versa, in a number of their captions.

Of course, the mistake got lit up on Twitter.

They Call Us Bruce - Episode 36: They Call Us #OscarsSoWhite

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.

What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. Each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

On this episode, we welcome April Reign, creator of the viral hashtag #OscarsSoWhite. Recorded on the eve of the 90th Academy Awards, we discuss Black Panther, the tired old excuses of the Hollywood establishment, and where the movement for diversity and inclusion goes from here.

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