6.19.2022

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Decades After Infamous Beating Death, Recent Attacks Haunt Asian Americans
Vincent Chin, a Chinese immigrant, was beaten to death after being pursued by two white Detroit autoworkers in 1982. On the 40th anniversary of his death, many hear frightening echoes.

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How I Became an Asian American
"I hope Mr. Chin becomes an even more potent symbol of overdue justice not only for Asian Americans but for all Americans who know their worth is more than what racism and capitalism demand."

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"You Know What I Say About Men Who F--- Asian Women?"
"When white women hypersexualize Asian women onscreen, we suffer the consequences."

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Don’t be fooled — Asian American voters are more progressive than you might think
"The Asian American community can be a progressive political force at the polls. However, political leaders, parties and organizations must make some serious long-term and sustained investments in our communities — not just when they need our votes."

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'A lot of Costco love' — How the warehouse retailer became a staple of Asian America
Asian Americans are the fastest-growing demographic in the U.S. They’re also a disproportionate number of Costco's customers. Asians comprise about 7% of the U.S. population, but make up 11.9% of Costco shoppers.

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"She showed the way" — Viet Thanh Nguyen on Maxine Hong Kingston
Viet Thanh Nguyen talks about Maxine Hong Kingston’s influence and editing a collection of the author’s writing.

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How Dustin Nguyen of '21 Jump Street' helped change the way we see Asian American men
Dustin Nguyen doesn't sit around and think about being a "pioneer." But decades after his iconic, breakthrough role on 21 Jump Street -- as a rare Asian American heartthrob on a mainstream show -- that's what he is.


6.14.2022

"An immigrants' kid punched Hitler in the mouth while cosplaying the American flag"

Gene Luen Yang on the corniness and coolness of Captain America -- the hero who is a flag on the move.



"The hero who dresses like the American flag. You can't get much cornier than that." As a young comic book reader, Gene Luen Yang didn't think much of Captain America. To be honest, he summarily dismissed Marvel Comics' star-spangled superhero as a dork -- and certainly nowhere near as cool as the X-Men.

But over time, Gene's relationship to Cap has evolved -- much like the flag, and America itself. In his foreword to the new Penguin Classics Marvel Collection edition of CAPTAIN AMERICA, the award-winning comic book creator shares about coming around to the appeal of Captain America's undeniable dorkiness, and his connection to Cap as a fellow child of immigrants. We're delighted to share Gene's foreword here:


6.12.2022

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The man who murdered my brother post-9/11 just died. This is why I mourn him
"In the end, the legacy of the man who gunned down my brother is not only violence and hate. His memory is also one of reconciliation and love."

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It's Been 50 Years. I Am Not 'Napalm Girl' Anymore.
For decades, Kim Phuc Phan Thi has struggled with the infamous photo of her at fleeing a bombed village when she was 9 years old. Today, she thinks of the children of Uvalde, cautioning that school shootings are the "domestic equivalent of war."

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By Accident of Birth
NPR's Throughline tells the story of Wong Kim Ark, who forever changed the path of American immigration law in the 1897 Supreme Court cast United States v. Wong Kim Ark.

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This photographer's surreal images explore the complexity of Asian American identity
Photographer Michelle Watt's portrait series "Lunar Geisha" is an exploration of Asian American female identity, examining who how East Asian women are perceived by society, how they are thrust into playing certain roles, the ways in which they become complicit in those stereotypes and the ways in which they rebel against them.

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After his son died on a USC film shoot, a father is still looking for answers
When Peng Wang died on a USC film shoot in the Imperial Sand Dunes, his father flew from China to find answers.

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Andrew Ahn Did Want to Show Dick on Fire Island
Andrew Ahn talks about directing Fire Island and the importance of having nudity onscreen.

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'Fire Island' and the Bechdel Test: Turning the Debacle Into a Learning Opportunity
A tweet criticized the gay Asian rom-com for failing to adequately represent women. Now what?

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The Indian Action Blockbuster That Should Make Hollywood Jealous
RRR is the heroic epic we’ve been waiting for—one that’s not afraid of its own extravagance.

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'Liquor Store Dreams' Tells Personal Story Of Korean-American Experience In One Pocket Of L.A.
In So Yun Um's feature documentary debut Liquor Store Dreams, she calls herself a "liquor store baby," a first-generation American born to Korean immigrant parents who opened corner stores in "Black and Brown communities in Los Angeles."

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Worst Episode Ever Returns to Remind Us Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers Once Went Bizarrely Racist
"It’s absolutely crazy this cartoon was made barely more than 30 years ago. In fact, the episode is so problematic that it was redubbed and re-edited after it originally aired in 1990, and that’s the only version currently available for viewing, and it still has the warning in front of it. And it should!"


6.05.2022

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States are mandating Asian American history lessons to stop bigotry
As anti-Asian attacks surge nationwide, a movement is hoping to combat hate with history, pushing states to require lessons on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in public schools.

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May We Please Just Date Without Hate?
An Asian American college couple tries to let their young love bloom, but racist incidents keep disrupting their honeymoon phase.

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You're called a 'model minority' as an Asian American — until they decide you aren't
"Privilege-adjacent. Invisible at times. As an Asian American, that's how I typically used to think of my minority status. Society labels us the "model minority" when it is convenient. Sometimes we're models to be emulated — when we're not on the receiving end of people's fear, anger and suspicion."

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Why We Make Fun of the Way Other People Eat
On #Swedengate and why we fixate on other cultures' eating habits.

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One 'underdog' candidate sees opportunity in N.Y. maps mess
New York congressional candidate Yuh-Line Niou is vying with better-known Bill de Blasio and Rep. Mondaire Jones, but she sees an opening with an electorate that is 20 percent Asian American voters.

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A single photo can change the world. I know, because I took one that did.
"Kim Phuc and I are two people intertwined in history. To this day, I view her as family. She calls me 'uncle,' and I talk with her often. But I will always hate the circumstances in which we met."

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The Doughnut Kids Are All Right
The next generation of Los Angeles doughnut shop owners are preserving, innovating on, and continuing a uniquely Khmerican experience.

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Elvis reimagined as an Asian American icon
Tommy Kha has photographed a number of people who emulate Elvis Presley over the years, but in this portrait he offers himself as the American icon.

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Chan Is Missing: Lost (and Not Found) in Chinatown
The 1982 film distills a set of broad social themes through intimate snapshots of San Francisco's Chinatown neighborhood and its delightful panoply of personalities.

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Joel Kim Booster Doesn't Need Gay Rom-Com 'Fire Island' to Be Palatable for 'Certain People'
Fire Island star/writer Joel Kim Booster wrote his gay, Asian American romantic comedy script inspired by a trip Fire Island and Pride and Prejudice.

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Daniel Dae Kim's Journey From Actor to Advocate
The actor talks about remaining true to his values, finding the courage to speak up, and why it's hard to watch 'Friends.'

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Filmmaker Geeta Malik on Representation: 'Being Seen Can Be a Double-Edged Sword' (Guest Column)
"I feel like I'm always walking that tightrope between celebrating my culture and resisting people who try to make it the most interesting thing about me."

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AAPI scribes on Grey's Anatomy and Pachinko reveal what it's really like in the writers' room
Three Asian American writers on high-profile shows discuss what's changed and what's remained the same in the writer's room.

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Margaret Cho Has Always Been Unapologetically Ahead Of Her Time
Nancy Wang Yuen reflects on Margaret Cho's long career and its impact on her own life.

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'Crying in H Mart' Made Michelle Zauner a Literary Star. What's Next?
The odds are against making a career as an indie musician. Finding success as a memoirist is equally unlikely. Michelle Zauner, improbably, has done both.

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How Wayne Wang Faces Failure
Filmmaker Wayne Wang discusses his political and artistic education, the contradictions of being Asian in America, and the importance of "unlearning everything."


5.29.2022

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A photographer's journey to reconnect with his Chinese American identity
"These images tell the story of not only those who were brave enough to build new lives in America but the story of the generations that came after; how they persisted with their dreams and fought for their culture to exist in a society that wasn't welcoming."

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What Corky Lee Taught Me
Photographer An Rong Xu pays tribute to Corky, who passed away in January last year. For decades, Lee worked to not only document the day-to-day lives of Asian Americans, but also to correct American history that left out Asian Americans.

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A Genocide Left Their Families In A Cycle Of Trauma. Now, A Generation Of Cambodian Americans is Finding A Path Toward Healing.
Immigrating to the U.S. meant pushing aside the pain caused by Khmer Rouge atrocities. For those who grew up in the aftermath, moving forward means working with their elders to process damaging memories.

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How a Family Fruit Stand Became Northern California's Best-Kept Pie Secret
After 70 years, the family-run market and destination pie stop Ikeda's maintains its charm off I-80.

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The Ballad Of Chol Soo Lee: How Asian Americans United To Free A Man Wrongly Convicted Of Murder
Chol Soo Lee seemed an unlikely candidate to inspire a movement, but that's what happened when he was wrongly convicted of a San Francisco gangland murder in 1974.

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Asians in Hollywood Are Finally Showing Their True Selves, Flaws and All
"The power of Everything Everywhere All At Once lies in its comfort of not performatively overcorrecting for the non-Asian audience. An Asian film need not get upon stilts to drive the point home that 'these are not your typical Asians.' We've already passed the audition. The characters should simply be because there is room for everyone."

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'Star Trek: Strange New Worlds' Star Christina Chong Discusses Her Heartbreaking Childhood Connection to La'an Noonien-Singh
Star Trek: Strange New Worlds star Christina Chong discusses turning pain into strength and using all those emotions to better capture and understand the complexities of her character.


5.15.2022

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Remembering a Victim of an Anti-Asian Attack, a Hundred and Fifty Years Later
Gene Tong, a popular herbal-medicine doctor in Los Angeles, was hanged by a mob during one of the worst mass lynchings in American history.

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James Hong Really Is Everything, Everywhere, All at Once
The 93-year-old vet has more than 450 credits under his belt -- and, as of this week, a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

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Smuggled, Heartbroken and Triumphant: How 3 Comics Tell the Immigrant Story
The profound and painful tribulations of the Asian American journey are centered in Asian American Eyz'd: An Immigrant Comedy Special — a film project by Ana Tuazon Parsons, Nicky Endres and Aidan Park.

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How TikTok's king of poses teaches his 4 million followers to take better photos
Photographer David Suh teaches his 4 million TikTok followers how to pose with confidence.

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In their search for love, South Asians swipe right on dating apps catered for them
Mirchi is among the growing world of dating apps created by and catering to South Asians.

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Ellen Pao on What Asian American Women Need from Workplaces
TIME talked to four Asian American women who have built successful careers within their own industries while advocating alongside other AAPI professionals to build better workplaces for their communities.


5.10.2022

James Hong: The Man, The Myth, The Legend



Finally! After seven decades in show business with over 600 film and television roles to his name -- perhaps the most credited Hollywood actor in history -- legendary actor James Hong is being honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. At 93 years old, he is the oldest actor yet to receive this distinction.

Most recently, you may have seen him playing Michelle Yeoh's father in Daniels' genre-bending multiverse epic Everything Everywhere All at Once. Here's a featurette from A24 with his cast mates including Yeoh, Ke Huy Quan and Stephanie Hsu, talking about Hong and his pioneering career:

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