12.15.2017

Angry Reader of the Week: Jess Ju

"This interview probably should have been typed in ALL CAPS."



Hello, good people of the internet. It is time, once again, to meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Jess Ju.

12.14.2017

Stay Angry, But Not Hangry

Sponsored Post by KPOP Foods



KPOP Foods was started by a couple of friends who came together through a mutual love for Korean food (and soju), and wanted to share their obsession with the flavors and experience of eating Korean food with America. Powered by an enormously successful Kickstarter campaign, their first product is KPOP Sauce, a "chili sauce with attitude" that can be used for cooking and as a condiment, "good on everything from burgers to broccoli."

Want to get a taste of KPOP Sauce in action? The folks at KPOP Foods have cooked up a special recipe just for you, the good readers of this blog: Angry Asian Man's Pork Belly & Kimchi Grilled Cheese Sandwich. A spicy, Korean twist on a cheesy traditional American classic.

12.13.2017

Asians on TV: Do Networks Make the Grade?

Asian Pacific American Media Coalition releases latest diversity "Report Card"; Fox gets an Incomplete.



Over the last few years, we've seen some decent strides in the number of roles for Asian Americans on television. But how do the numbers actually stack up? The Asian Pacific American Media Coalition (APAMC) just released its most recent "Report Card" grading the four major television networks on their progress toward diversity and inclusion of Asian Americans for the 2016-17 season.

At the top of the class: ABC. On the strength of its 21 regular and 23 recurring Asian American actors in prime time television -- including an unprecedented three series featuring Asian American actors in lead roles last season -- the network scored an A-, the highest grade the Coalition has ever given in that category. ABC also led the networks in the categories of Writers/Producers, Directors and Commitment to the Diversity Initiatives, ultimately receiving an overall grade of B. (Let's skip the jokes about "The Asian F." For now.)

In contrast, CBS had 16 Asian American regulars and 22 recurring for a grade of B- in the Actors category, and only 15 Asian American Writers or Producers for a grade of C in that category. NBC had only 11 Asian American regulars and 24 recurring for a grade of C+ in the Actors category, and a total of 18 Asian American Writers or Producer for a grade of C+ in that category. Because both CBS and NBC have a significant number of programs featuring AAPI actors, writers and/or producers in Development (receiving a grade of B+ and B-, respectively, in that category), there's hope their numbers will improve in coming seasons.

Here's the report card:

12.12.2017

Ian Chen joins the cast of DC's Shazam!

Fresh Off the Boat star will play Billy Batson's friend Eugene.



Shazam! Heck yeah, we've got an Asian kid in this superhero flick. Ian Chen, who plays Evan on Fresh Off the Boat, has joined the cast of the movie Shazam!, based on the DC Comics superhero.

Ian Chen & Jovan Armand Join 'Shazam!'

Starring Zachary Levi as the title character and Asher Angel as Billy Batson, the film center on Billy, a kid who can transform into an adult superhero by uttering the magic word "Shazam!"

Ian will play Eugene Choi, a friend of Billy's from a group home. The cast also includes Jovan Armand as Pedro Pena, and Jack Dylan Grazer as Freddy Freeman, who are all part of Billy's friend crew.

This is Mony Neth

Guest Post by Thi Bui



This is Mony Neth. He's the same age as me -- forty two. I came from Viet Nam; he came from Cambodia. His family fled the Khmer Rouge when he was just a few months old. He spent years in a refugee camp in Thailand. By the time Mony arrived in the U.S. as a refugee, he was ten years old.

When he was a teenager, he was convicted of possessing a weapon and receiving stolen property and lost his green card. That was twenty two years ago. Since then, Mony got married, raised a daughter who is now sixteen, and cares for his aging parents. He installs solar panels for a living and serves the homeless with his church community. Even the court that convicted him has recognized his efforts to turn his life around, granting him a certificate of rehabilitation.

But that wasn't enough for ICE.

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee dead at 65

Edwin M. Lee was the first Asian American mayor of San Francisco.



A pioneer in Asian American and San Francisco politics has died. San Francisco mayor Edwin M. Lee, the first Asian American to lead the city, died early Tuesday of an apparent heart attack. He was 65.

Ed Lee, San Francisco Mayor, Dies at 65

According to the San Francisco Examiner, the mayor was shopping at a neighborhood supermarket when he suffered a heart attack. He was taken to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 1:11 am.

"It is with profound sadness and terrible grief that we confirm that Mayor Edwin M. Lee passed away on Tuesday, December 12 at 1:11 a.m. at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. Family, friends and colleagues were at his side," his office said in a statement.

12.11.2017

Kelly Marie Tran Had the Best Damn Time at 'The Last Jedi' Premiere

"Kelly Marie Tran is how all of us would be if we were cast in a Star Wars film."



Over the weekend, at long last, Star Wars: The Last Jedi held its world premiere in Los Angeles. Fans lined the red carpet to get a glimpse of the saga's stars, and reactions to the long-awaited sequel are apparently good (I've been avoiding all of it -- really trying to stay spoiler-free). But hands down, the highlight of the premiere was the mega-franchise's newest star, Kelly Marie Tran, having the best damn time.

Tran plays Rose Tico, a behind-the-scenes Resistance nobody who gets thrust into the action when she goes on a mission with Finn. Up until recently, Tran -- much like Rose -- was also kind of a nobody, a struggling actress with a comedy background trying to break into Hollywood and working odd jobs to make ends meet. Until the biggest movie franchise of all time plucked her from obscurity to play a role that will most certainly make her a household name. And from the looks of it, she is not taking any of this shit for granted.

In addition to looking drop dread gorgeous in red, Tran was seen spending a good portion of the festivities adorably freaking out, getting visibly emotional, hugging everyone in sight and overall looking like she was genuinely totally stoked just to be there. As Dani Fernandez observed, via Twitter, "Kelly Marie Tran is how all of us would be if we were cast in a Star Wars film."

New Jersey teacher accused of making anti-Korean comments

A teacher at Bergen Academies High School reportedly singled out Korean students and said "I hate Koreans."



In New Jersey, a high school teacher is under fire for recent comments she made during class, reportedly saying she hated the Korean culture and telling Korean students, "I hate Koreans."

Bergen Academies teacher accused of making anti-Korean comments

The teacher, whose name is being withheld, teaches Spanish at the prestigious Bergen Academies High School in Hackensack. According to The Korea Daily, the teacher asked students what their native countries of origin were. When a Korean student answered "Korea," the teacher reportedly said, "I hate Korean." Later, in another class, she allegedly asked Korean students to raise their hands and repeated the sentiment.

School administrators say the teacher has been reassigned to different classrooms and offered verbal apologies to the students. But community leaders representing ten Korean American organizations are now calling for the teacher to be fired, among other demands, claiming it wasn't an isolated incident. The teacher's remarks are allegedly part of a "years-long pattern" of derogatory comments and discriminatory behavior.

12.10.2017

Read These Blogs


The tears of Kelly Marie Tran over Star Wars gives us hope: As the stars hit the Crait carpet at the Star Wars: The Last Jedi premiere in Los Angeles on Saturday night, one particular cast member couldn't contain her tears of joy. And honestly, who could blame her?

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Kelly Marie Tran steps into Star Wars stardom in 'Last Jedi': 28-year-old Kelly Marie Tran still can't believe she's in a Star Wars movie. "I am just trying to stay present and really trying to experience every moment of this. It still feels very impossible and very much like it's all a big dream or something."

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The Last Jedi's Kelly Marie Tran is the heroine we've been waiting for: Here, Tran talks about landing the biggest gig of her life, and how hard it was to keep the secret from everyone.

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Reports of crimes against Asians are rising in some cities. Police are working to figure out why. Something curious was happening with crime in California's state capital of Sacramento, police have noticed.

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Pearl Harbor Lessons: Trump's Muslim Ban Same 'Prejudice' Japanese Americans Faced During WWII, ACLU Lawyer Warns: "Seventy-six years after Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, the grandson of a Japanese American woman held in a concentration camp on U.S. soil during World War II is worried President Donald Trump has reinvigorated the discriminatory sentiments that saw his grandmother treated like an enemy in her own country."

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25 Years Later, He Speaks To The Man Who Killed His Son: On December 14, 1992, Wayne Lo went to his college in Massachusetts, armed with a semiautomatic rifle, and fired at random, killing two and wounding four. Now serving a life sentence, he agrees to speak to a victim's father about that day.

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What I Learned from Maxine Hong Kingston: For writer Alexis Cheung, Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior showed her that her own life was worthy of examination, even exaltation. And Cheung got the opportunity to tell her just that.

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Why 'The Crow' Director Is Adamantly Against the Upcoming Remake: Alex Proyas, director of the 1994 film The Crow, says a remake would dishonor late star Brandon Lee, who died while making the film.



12.08.2017

Angry Reader of the Week: Franny Choi

"But my heart is everywhere my loved ones are; so, everywhere."



Greetings, internet friends. It is time, once again, to meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Franny Choi.

The Time is Ticking to Get Covered

By Kyle Pongan. Sponsored by Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF)


As the son of an an immigrant from the Philippines and growing up with both parents who are nurses, I get how important health care is. And I get how hard it is to afford health insurance coverage and how confusing it can be to even sign up.

The thing is, I've been a hair stylist and a musician since 2015, and neither profession offers health insurance coverage. All that changed with the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare). Thanks to the law, I've been able to apply for and enroll in coverage at www.healthcare.gov, whether living in New York or now Philadelphia. For the past three years, I've had coverage that I can afford and count on. So no more crossing my fingers that I don't get sick.

I followed these steps to get covered:

12.07.2017

This Is Who The FBI Came For After Pearl Harbor

Remember the lives lost and the lives forever changed.



Today, December 7, marks the 76th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Hours following the attack, the FBI began rounding up and detaining leaders in the Japanese American community from their homes without due process of law. Filmmaker Tad Nakamura's grandfather was one of those taken.

This one-minute video for the Nikkei Democracy Project, made with documentary footage from Something Strong Within (by Tad's parents, Bob Nakamura and Karen Ishizuka), is not only a reminder of lives lost in the attack, but the lives forever changed by fear and bigotry.

Asian American, Black activists rally for immigration reform

"We are making it known that this is a rainbow movement."



From Huffington Post: Asian-American and black activists took to Capitol Hill on Wednesday, calling on Congress to move quickly to address immigration reform.

An estimated 150 protesters, led by nonprofit UndocuBlack Network and Asian-American coalition AAPI Immigrant Rights Organizing Table, rallied to ask Congress to pass a clean Dream Act, which would provide a pathway to citizenship for young undocumented immigrants with no strings attached, along with a permanent solution for temporary protected status (TPS) holders.

"I stand in solidarity with Dreamers. I stand in solidarity with folks with TPS," Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.) said at the rally. “We are making it known that this is a rainbow movement."

More here: Asian-American, Black Activists Rally Together For Immigrants In Their Communities

12.06.2017

Survey Says: Asian Americans experience discrimination

New survey finds Asian Americans experience and perceive discrimination in many areas of their daily lives.



From National Public Radio: New results from an NPR survey show that large numbers of Asian-Americans experience and perceive discrimination in many areas of their daily lives. This happens despite their having average incomes that outpace other racial, ethnic and identity groups.

The poll, a collaboration among NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, also finds a wide gap between immigrant and nonimmigrant Asian-Americans in reporting discrimination experiences, including violence and harassment.

"Our poll shows that Asian-American families have the highest average income among the groups we've surveyed, and yet the poll still finds that Asian-Americans experience persistent discrimination in housing, jobs and at college," says Robert Blendon, professor of health policy and political analysis at the Harvard Chan School who co-directed the survey. "Over the course of our series, we are seeing again and again that income is not a shield from discrimination."

More here: Poll: Asian-Americans See Individuals' Prejudice As Big Discrimination Problem

They Call Us Bruce - Episode 30: They Call Us Claudia Kishi

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. Each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

This episode, we welcome CB Lee, author of the YA superhero novel Not Your Sidekick. They discuss the iconic Claudia Kishi of The Babysitters Club, the questionably curious true identity of comic book writer Akira Yoshida, and the complexities of authorship and authenticity.

Kal Penn signs a book deal

Actor will share his unique American success story in a new essay collection to be published in 2019.



From Deadline: Actor and civil servant Kal Penn has signed a book/audiobook deal with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt & Audible. The book will be a collection of essays set to be published in 2019.

The book will include his unique 21st-century American success story as he writes about ambition, the challenges of navigating Hollywood, and his unusual sabbatical from actor to White House staffer. From the sound of it, his role in the cult Harold and Kumar franchise, experiences with stereotypical auditions and his work with the Obama administration will give Penn plenty of material to sculpt a good read. Senior editor Kate Napolitano acquired the book in her first official deal since joining the Houghton Mifflin Harcourt last month.

More here: Kal Penn Lands Book Deal With Houghton Mifflin Harcourt & Audible

A play called 'Straight White Men' is about to make history

Playwright Young Jean Lee is the first ever Asian American woman with a play on Broadway.



From Splinter: A play called Straight White Men is about to make history, becoming the first play written by an Asian American woman to appear on Broadway. The show, written by experimental Korean-American playwright (and David Byrne and Kathleen Hanna collaborator) Young Jean Lee, revolves around three brothers (the aforementioned straight white men) visiting their widower father for Christmas. The eldest brother has an existential crisis over his failure to fulfill his own potential and privilege, and other things surely happen as well. It debuted in 2014 and was deemed both "compassionate and stimulating" and "mournful and inquisitive" by the New York Times.

More here: A Play by an Asian American Woman Will Appear on Broadway for the First Time Ever

Shooting suspect pleads not guilty in hate crime killing

Adam Puninton yelled "get out of my country" before fatally shooting Srinivas Kuchibhotla.



The racist sack of shit defendant in the hate crime killing of an Indian engineer at a suburban Kansas City bar was arraigned Thursday after waiving his right to a preliminary hearing, pleading not guilty.

Not guilty plea in alleged hate crime killing of Indian man at Olathe bar

Adam Purinton is charged with first-degree murder in the fatal shooting that killed 32-year-old Srinivas Kuchibhotla in February. He also faces two counts of attempted first-degree murder for wounding two other men.

12.04.2017

The voice of Apu responds to 'The Problem with Apu'

"We're just really thinking about it. It's a lot to digest."



Comedian Hari Kondabolu's truTV documentary The Problem with Apu set out to explore the impact of casual racism in The Simpsons in the form a racist, broadly offensive stereotype that has plagued South Asians for decades: Apu, the show's Indian convenience store owner.

The film got a lot of people talking, which was great, though I'm guessing that most of Hari's fans were aware of said problem with Apu. If you watched The Problem with Apu and it was all totally mind-blowing news to you, congratulations; you were part of the film's target audience.

But here's the big question: have the folks at The Simpsons seen The Problem with Apu? And how about Hank Azaria, the white actor who provides the super-stereotypical voice Apu? (Or, as Hari puts it, "a white guy doing an impression of a white guy making fun of my father.") One of plot points of the documentary concerns Hari's attempts to interview Azaria and talk about the character on camera. It doesn't happen.

However, it seems that Azaria has indeed seen the film. Speaking to a reporter from TMZ, who asked for this thoughts on the documentary, Azaria said that Kondabolu "made some really interesting points" and "gave us a lot at The Simpsons to think about, and we are really thinking about it."

How Asian Grandpas Get Down With The Weeknd

Just another day at the park with your Asian grandpa...



This is the silliest thing you'll see today. Let it be your guide.

Funny video makers Chuck Maa and Geo Lee, aka Seventh Grade, teamed up with Will Choi of Asian AF to channel their future Asian grandpa selves for this incredible lip sync video to the tune of "I Feel It Coming." Daft Punk ain't got nothing on these visor-clad old timers. Check those stretches. Feel it.

This Christmas, Take a Ride On The Most Racist Bus in Illinois!

"You won't feel like you're in China when you're on our buses."



A transportation company that services the Champaign-Urbana area in Illinois is under fire for a racist, anti-Chinese message included in a promotional email sent out to its mailing list over the weekend.

Suburban Express sends controversial Christmas email

Suburban Express sent an email touting the perks of its Christmas break bus services for University of Illinois students. Among other self-identified selling points, the Surburban Express Experience includes riding with "Passengers like you. You won't feel like you're in China when you're on our buses."

This, of course, refers to the University's large population of international students.

12.03.2017

Read These Blogs


No, Marvel, Promoting a White Guy Who Faked a Japanese Identity Is Not Normal: Faking an identity at work gets most people fired, not promoted to editor-in-chief -- except at Marvel Comics, where C.B. Cebulski's bizarre past as writer "Akira Yoshida" is being swept under the rug.

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Stanford: Sexual misconduct revelation exposes storied professor's secret: For Professor Jay Fliegelman, the transgression was but a blip in a storied career at Stanford University. For Seo-Young "Jennie" Chu, it represented years of trauma. After years of staying silent, she went public.

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How Thinking Like An Entrepreneur Helped One Artist Build A Thriving Career: New York-based spoken word performer, musician, activist and artist Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai discusses how she built her career -- by thinking like an entrepreneur.

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Postmortem: Every Frame a Painting: Tony Zhou, the creator/editor/narrator behind the popular YouTube channel Every Frame a Painting, explains why the project is calling it quits.

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Director Leena Pendharkar Gives Birth to 20 Weeks: Leena Pendharkar's 20 Weeks is a film about a couple who discover that their unborn child may have serious developmental problems. Pendharkar discusses the making of her second film and her team's approach to casting and diversity.

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Ashok and Aparna Spice Up the Neighborhood: Comedian Aparna Nancherla talks standup, battling anxiety, and pushing the envelope as a woman of color in comedy

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Snowboard sensation Kim seeking a home away from home in PyeongChang: U.S. snowboarder Chloe Kim enjoyed an outstanding Winter Youth Olympics Games in 2016, winning gold in two categories. This teen will be among the favorites when she makes her full Olympic debut at Pyeongchang in 2018.

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‘Crazy Rich Asians' Star: Hollywood Caves To Diversity When It's Scared: Nora Lum, AKA Awkwafina, chats about the significance of the casting of Crazy Rich Asians and the true story behind that one line in her song “NYC Bitche$" about bringing live chickens onto the subway.

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Meet The Pride of 'Runaways': Brittany Ishibashi and James Yaegashi: Brittany Ishibashi and James Yaegashi discuss playing the Minorus in Hulu's Runaways.



12.01.2017

Asian AF Presents Filipino AF: Special Holiday Edition!

Friday, December 8 at Upright Citizens Brigade in Los Angeles



Los Angeles! Down for some laughs? Come see all the funny Filipino Americans next Friday at the Upright Citizens Brigade in Hollywood. The wildly successful Filipino AF show, presented by Asian AF, returns to UCB for a Special Holiday Edition. The evening will include sketch, standup, musical comedy, improv and more, hosted by Joy Regullano, Erich Tamola and Allyn Pintal. And let me tell you, it's going to be Filipino as hell.

It's happening Friday, December 8 at the UCB's Inner Sanctum Cafe. Here are some more details:

Angry Reader of the Week: Sun Yunfan

"Last name Sun. First name Yunfan."



Hey, everybody! Gather 'round, because it's time to meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Sun Yunfan.

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