5.25.2020

This Is, As They Say, Some High Effort Racism

And Other Things to Know From Angry Asian America.



Woman Arrested for Posting Racist Notes on Homes
On Friday, a Bay Area woman was arrested for posting racist notes on homes in San Leandro. 52-year-old Nancy Arechiga is accused of taping up messages on trees and the doors of at least five homes in the Heron Bay neighborhood. The full-page hand-written notes begin with the preamble of the U.S. Constitution, then demand that the recipient "go back" to their country of origin. One of the notes ends with a very specific ultimatum: "You have until the day May/23/2020 Saturday 10:30 AM to leave this country. In this country no Asian allowed. My country U.S.A." Arechiga was arrested for distributing threatening messages that "instilled fear and intimidation upon those residents," according to police. Like I said, this is some high effort racism.

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Seattle Police Search for Suspect in 3 Bias Incidents targeting Asians
In Seattle, police are investigating three separate incidents of bias targeting people of Asian descent that were reported on Saturday, possibly all committed by the same suspect. Two of the incidents occurred at Golden Gardens Park: a woman was accosted by a man who demanded her identification and yelled, "Chinese disease.. they bring it here!" Later, a couple was targeted by a man who yelled, spat on them and demanded to know where they ere from. In another incident at a restaurant, a man yelled racist remarks about Asians, knocked on the restaurant's windows, kicked a sign inside the business, then threatened to throw a table at an employee. Yeah, these all sound like the same guy.

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CNN's Natasha Chen Describes Beachgoer's Racist Taunt
CNN correspondent Natasha Chen says a man yelled racist comments at her while she was on location working on a story about people headed to the beach on Memorial Day, despite the coronvirus pandemic. Chen was filming a segment at Myrtle Beach, South Carolina when a man approached her and started "yelling expletives" about her wearing a mask and blaming her for the pandemic. By blaming her, of course, he meant Asians. Honestly, given the circumstances, I would have been surprised if she didn't encounter some racist bullshit.

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100 Writers Call for an End to Anti-Asian Hostility
More than 100 prominent writers, including several top Asian American authors, have called for an end to a surge in anti-Asian hostility in the US which they say has been “egged on” during the pandemic by the Trump administration’s pandering to racist tropes. The authors of the joint statement, coordinated by Pen America and the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, say that "the time to turn back this wave of hate is now. Reports of any individuals being spat on, stabbed, beat up, or verbally assaulted are disturbing enough when they are isolated incidents. When such attacks are collectively driven by hate, in such large volume, the onus lies heavily on civil society and our elected representatives to condemn them."

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Lion's Share Live: But Where Are You From?
Heads up. I'll be moderating a panel, "But Where Are You From?" as part of Lion's Share Live, a week-long live-streamed experience celebrating culture, creativity and community during Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. We'll be talking Asian stereotypes with Eugene Lee Yang, Tracy Chou, Kayvan Daragheh, Jenny Yang. It's happening Friday, May 29 at 12:00pm PT on Twitch. All proceeds from the event will be donated to the American Immigration Council.



5.24.2020

Read These Blogs



Lucky Grandma Is a Love Letter to Chinatown, Its Matriarchs, and Their Rule-Breaking Style
The new film Lucky Grandma shines a spotlight on the strong-willed, badass matriarch played by the legendary Tsai Chin, while underscoring the inherent swag of the elderly residents of New York City's Chinatown.

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The Rise of Anti-Asian Hate in the Wake of Covid-19
Coinciding with Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Jennifer Lee and Monica Yadav chronicle the rise of attacks, harassment and bias toward Asian Americans as the Covid-19 pandemic has unfolded as part of our "Covid-19 and the Social Sciences" series.

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Asian-American studies, more vital than ever: Coronavirus is a moment we should be learning
Incidents of hate crimes against Asian Americans have risen during this pandemic, but this is far from an isolated event. Asian American studies provides important context for racism in the United States.

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An Asian American doctor's perspective on being viewed as the solution and the problem
"I don the mask of a health care hero at work, only to doff it as the villain outside"

* * *

The Pandemic Forced Me Into a Multigenerational Home
But the arrangement does work.

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A Season to Celebrate Asian American Theater Is Lost to Pandemic
Briefly this spring New York theaters featured a stunning array of plays by writers of Asian descent, showing diversity and adventurous experimentation. Then the COVID-19 pandemic aborted their moment.

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In A Racism-Fueled Pandemic, Asian Americans Find Healing Through Art And Storytelling
As the coronavirus continues to ravage the globe, Asian Americans are using their creativity to tell their own stories and find validation in their communities.

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Overlooked No More: When Hazel Ying Lee and Maggie Gee Soared the Skies
Hazel Ying Lee and Maggie Gee never met, but as the only two Chinese-American women pilots during World War II, their lives ran a strikingly similar course, and both thwarted layers of prejudice.

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Elegy for the All-American, Asian-American Buffet
Why the loss of buffet chains like Sweet Tomatoes and Hometown Buffet hits hard for Asian Americans.

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A Vacation that Led to an Unexpected Arranged Marriage Proposal
Monica Luhar tells the story of her parents' union, an unexpected arrangement for both of them.

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In Conversation With Harvey Weinstein's Former Assistant, Rowena Chiu
"He could sue me for every single interview I've ever done for breaking my NDA, but in practice, he's probably not going to. He's got bigger problems."

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How Yuri Kochiyama Inspired this Young Oakland Artist
Kathy Liang painted a mural inspired by a quote from late civil rights leader Yuri Kochiyama.

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Poet and author Bao Phi: 'It felt like the hate was cranked up to 11'
An interview with Vietnamese American poet and author Bao Phi, whose theatre adaptation of his children's book, A Different Pond, was postponed due to COVID.

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Why Yo-Yo Ma Would Invite Socrates to Dinner
The New York Times asks renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma about what books have influenced his artistic development, what books are on his nightstand, and the three writers he'd invite to a dinner party.

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What K-Pop's Beautiful Men Can Teach Us About Masculinity
K-pop's rise in America is forcing many to confront long-held stereotypes they have regarding masculinity — especially when it comes to Asian men.

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14 Asian American Stars Recall When They First Felt Represented in TV and Movies
Asian American entertainers dig deep into their memory to talk about the first time they felt represented while watching a mainstream Hollywood movie and TV show.

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Linsanity, Redux: Jeremy Lin's Star Is Shining Bright In Beijing
After injuries derailed his NBA career, Jeremy Lin took a step he always knew he would: Playing in China, where he remains a megastar -- even as play is suspended.

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Fast & Furious Is the Greatest American Blockbuster Franchise. This Is How it Happened.
Before COVID-19 pushed the release of F9, Justin Lin explained how he turned a series about stunts, cars, and family into Hollywood's most inclusive and beloved franchise.

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Hong Chau Doesn't Need Your Approval
"I don't task myself with changing minds or being understood anymore."

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Issa Rae and Kumail Nanjiani on the Real Challenge of 'The Lovebirds'
Issa Rae and Kumail Nanjiani say their new Netflix movie The Lovebirds, which starts where most rom-coms end, needed to acknowledge their characters were people of color.



5.22.2020

Angry Reader of the Week: Sasie Sealy

"We'd all be better off if we just gave each other the benefit of the doubt."



Hey, everybody. It's that time again. Let us meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Sasie Sealy.

5.21.2020

They Call Us Bruce - Episode 99: They Call Us Lynn Chen

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

On this episode, we welcome Lynn Chen, who wrote, directed, produced and stars in the movie I Will Make You Mine. She talks about getting the "band" back together, the song that almost busted her budget, and completing the lowest budget movie trilogy ever.

5.17.2020

Read These Blogs



What I Want the Woman Behind the Counter to Know
Remember this the next time you order takeout.

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Why I’ve Stopped Telling People I’m Not Chinese
When confronted with racism toward anyone, our instinct should be indignation, not deflection.

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Taking My Place at My Father's Grocery Store
"Under the new state order, grocery stores were deemed one of the few essential businesses allowed to remain open. Our neighborhood would depend on us -- I think I can say this without exaggeration -- to stay alive."

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What It Means to Make Art as an Asian American in the Pandemic
Many Asian-American artists feel a calling to make explicitly political art that pushes back against racism during the pandemic, continuing a legacy of protest art that began in the 1960s.

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Harvard Law School Came After Me for Speaking Up About My Sexual Assault
Kelly Yang attended Harvard Law School from 2002–2005. She was one of the youngest women ever to go to Harvard Law School, having gone to college at 13 and law school at 17 years old.

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This Korean Cooking Facebook Group Makes Me Feel Less Alone
It's an online utopia of eager-to-learn kimchi lovers.

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A New History of Being Asian-American
The PBS documentary series Asian Americans is an ambitious attempt to make Asian-American history accessible to a broader public.

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Jon M. Chu Picks His Most Influential Films from Asian-American Filmmakers
Director Jon M. Chu put together his personal list of influential Asian American filmmakers.

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Gene Luen Yang discusses Superman's battle against the KKK in new graphic novel
Gene Luen Yang’s adaptation of Superman Smashes the Klan focuses on a Chinese American family moving to a mostly white Metropolis suburb.

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Sandra Oh Is in a League of Her Own
What makes a woman of character? Just ask Sandra Oh.


5.15.2020

So Another Guy Wore a Klan Mask to the Grocery Store

And Other Things to Know From Angry Asian America.



Colorado Man Wears KKK Mask Inside Grocery Store
In Colorado, police are asking for community help in identifying a man who wore a Ku Klux Klan mask inside a local grocery store Thursday. Shoppers at the Dillon City Market were treated to the sight of a dude wearing a Klan-style pointed hood picking up some 2% in the dairy aisle. When store employees asked him to leave, he apparently refused. Police were called to the scene, but pointy reportedly left the area before they arrived. So is this becoming a thing? For the record, this is an entirely different incident from that other guy who wore a Klan hood in a San Diego area supermarket.

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Koreatown Company Accused of Touting Radish Paste as Coronavirus Deterrent
In Los Angeles, the city attorney announced a lawsuit against a local company for allegedly selling a radish paste as a way to prevent people from contracting COVID-19. According to the lawsuit, filed against Koreatown-based Insan Healing, the radish paste product had not been tested by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration or state agencies as a way to protect people against the virus, and advertising it as such is against California's laws of unfair competition.

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Asian American Doctors Created A Video To Challenge COVID-19 Racism
With the Asian Americans being widely scapegoated for COVID-19, a group of Asian American health care workers on the coronavirus front line created a video speaking out against the hate.

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Seadrift
In 1979, a Vietnamese refugee shot and killed a white crab fisherman at the public town docks in Seadrift, Texas. What began as a dispute over fishing territory erupts into violence and ignites a maelstrom of boat burnings, KKK intimidation, and other hostilities against Vietnamese refugees along the Gulf Coast. Set during the early days of Vietnamese refugee arrival in the U.S., Tim Tsai's feature documentary Seadrift examines the circumstances that led up to the shooting and its dramatic aftermath, and reveals the unexpected consequences that continue to reverberate today. The film is currently streaming on PBS.org.

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Online Class: Facing AAPI Race-Based Harassment
We all know the coronavirus pandemic has given rise to anti-Asian harassment and even violence. But will you know what to do if you are personally targeted or witness anti-Asian harassment? IMPACT Bay Area is offering free online classes to empower the community during the pandemic. From using your voice to expanding your self-care toolkit, they're here to help you and your loved ones grow your safety and confidence while remaining safe at home in support of public health. Find out more and register here.


5.14.2020

When White Supremacists Hack Your Zoom Session

And Other Things to Know From Angry Asian America.



Pilipino Workers Center's Zoom Town Hall Hacked by Racists
The Pilipino Workers Center works with the Filipino community in Southern California, providing resources, immigration assistance, housing support and fighting trafficking. This week, they were holding a COVID-19 town hall via Zoom when they were hacked by white supremacists who interrupted the proceedings, yelling and writing Nazi slogans and pro-Trump messages. See the video here and find out how to fight back.

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Give Essential
Give Essential, created by Dartmouth College roommates Amy Guan and Rine Uhm, is an online matching platform that helps connect essential workers with supplies from donors. Give Essential lets you send your extra household items directly to an essential worker who needs them, providing a way to support the frontline from your home. If you have any supplies or funds to share, you can help. Find out more here.

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COVID-19 Advocacy Leads to an Assembly Run for Francesca Hong
"If I don't fight for my business, if I don't fight for the industry, if I don't fight for individuals who are affected by this industry... it's a chain reaction, what happens if our businesses fail. If I don't at least try to fight for that from a political level, I don't think I would be fighting for my business and my family."

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'House Of Ho,' The 'Crazy Rich Asians'-Inspired Docuseries, Is Coming Soon
I don't want to watch this. But I want to watch this. "The House of Ho is a multigenerational family docusoap that chronicles the lives of a wealthy Vietnamese American family in Houston, Texas. Led by patriarch Binh Ho and his wife Hue Ho -- two immigrants from Vietnam who’ve built a multi-million empire and seem to be living the height of the American Dream -- the half-hour comedy will explore their lavish lifestyles and the drama that ensues as their two adult children, Judy and Washington, attempt to live up to their parents' expectations." The House of Ho premieres on HBO Max on July 16.

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Superman Smashes the Klan
The graphic novel Superman Smashes the Klan is now available as a full collected edition. Inspired by the 1940s Superman radio serial "Clan of the Fiery Cross," writer Gene Luen Yang and artist Gurihiru bring us a personal retelling of two different immigrants finding ways to belong. The year is 1946. Teenagers Roberta and Tommy Lee just moved with their parents from Chinatown to the center of Metropolis, home to the famous hero, Superman. Tommy makes friends quickly, while Roberta pines for home. Then one night, the family awakens to find their house surrounded by the Klan of the Fiery Kross! Superman leaps into action, but his exposure to a mysterious green rock has left him weak. Can Roberta and Tommy help him smash the Klan?



5.13.2020

Happy "APPI" Heritage Month from the White House

And Other Things to Know From Angry Asian America.


An Actual White House Event
If there's anybody you want kicking off a Heritage Month party, it's definitely these two guys.

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Mr. President, You Don't Speak for Asian Americans
"I'm angry at you for taking a month that has been set aside to celebrate the achievements of our Asian American and Pacific Islander forebears, people who gave their toil, their tears, their hopes, dreams and lives to this country, and turning it into a time of outrage, anxiety and despair."

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'I want you to know he died in the hospital alone, isolated and scared'
"Hi. Both my aunt and uncle work for you in Crete, Ne. They both tested positive for COVID and passed it on to my grandmother and grandfather who never left the house. My grandfather lost his battle last night after fighting for his life for a week. I want you to know he died in the hospital alone, isolated and scared..."

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Alison Roman's Comments About Chrissy Teigen and Marie Kondo Lit a Fire
Last week, drama erupted on social media when Alison Roman -- the cookbook author and New York Times food columnist of Instagram fame — criticized Chrissy Teigen, a bestselling cookbook author, and Marie Kondo, who popularized her organizing strategy in books and a television show, for monetizing their lifestyle brands. For some women in the food world, the controversy shed light on problems that had been simmering long before.

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Wong Kar-Wai’s New Film ‘Blossoms’ Set To Shoot in July
Hong Kong auteur Wong Kar-Wai's new film Blossoms is set to start shooting in mainland China in July. Wong's first film since 2013's The Grandmaster, and only his eleventh in more than three decades, Blossoms has been described as a a spiritual sequel to his landmark 2000 romance drama In the Mood for Love. Based on Jin Yucheng’s 2013 novel, the film will follow the lives of three Shanghai residents from the end of China's Cultural Revolution in the 1960s through their life in America in the 1990s.


5.12.2020

Happy AAPI Heritage Month From Donald Fucking Trump

And Other Things to Know From Angry Asian America.



Trump Claims Asian Americans Are Angry at 'What China Has Done' to U.S.
Having somehow spoken to every Asian person in the United States of America, Donald Trump claims that Asian Americans are angry at China for its handling of the pandemic. "Asian Americans are VERY angry at what China has done to our Country, and the World," Trump wrote on Twitter. "Chinese Americans are the most angry of all. I don't blame them!" No, we blame you. I can barely form words to express how angry this tweet makes me. I can say that, yes, Asian Americans are angry. We are angry at the steady stream of bullshit and incompetence coming from Trump and the White House and we've had enough.

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Singer Bryan Adams Blames 'Bat Eating' People for Coronavirus
In other social media nonsense, singer Bryan Adams is under fire for posting a bizarre rant in which he blamed "bat eating" people for the coronavirus. "Tonight was supposed to be the beginning of a tenancy of gigs at the @royalalberthall, but thanks to some fucking bat eating, wet market animal selling, virus making greedy bastards, the whole world is now on hold, not to mention the thousands that have suffered or died from this virus," Adams wrote on Instagram and Twitter Tuesday, alongside a video of him performing his song "Cuts Like a Knife." He has since deleted the posts. But we will remember this, Bryan, like the summer of '69.

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Small Plane Pulling Banner with "Chinese Virus" Flies Over San Antonio
Some people take their racism to new heights. On Monday, a small plane pulling a banner that read "Say Chinese Virus.com" was seen flying over the skies of San Antonio. Good ol' San Antonio, where a group gathered to protest a resolution unanimously approved by the San Antonio City Council last week condemning racism and hate speech and the use of words like "Chinese virus" to describe COVID-19. Because some people thinking aggressively calling it the "Chinese virus" is really going to stick it to China.

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Kung Fu Reboot Moves Forward with Series Order at The CW
The CW has given a series order to the modern day, gender-swapped reboot of Kung Fu, starring Olivia Liang. "A quarter-life crisis causes a young Chinese-American woman (Liang) to drop out of college and go on a life-changing journey to an isolated monastery in China. But when she returns to find her hometown overrun with crime and corruption, she uses her martial arts skills and Shaolin values to protect her community and bring criminals to justice...all while searching for the assassin who killed her Shaolin mentor and is now targeting her."

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2nd Annual AAPI Day Against Bullying + Hate, May 18
Act To Change is rallying the nation around the 2nd annual Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Day Against Bullying + Hate. It's more important now than ever that we stand up to xenophobia and racism. Act 2 Change's virtual program, UNITED WE STAND, will commemorate this day with special guests and performances. It's happening Monday, May 18 at 1-2:30PM PT / 4-5:30PM ET. For more information, go here


5.11.2020

Trump is That Kid Who Kicks the Ball Over the Fence When a Call Doesn't Go His Way

And Other Things to Know From Angry Asian America.


Trump Tells Asian American Reporter to "Ask China" About Deaths
Donald Trump abruptly ended his Monday press conference after a contentious exchange in which he asked an Asian American journalist to "ask China" about her question and then refused to take a query from another White House reporter. CBS News correspondent Weijia Jiang asked Trump why he sees coronavirus testing as a global competition when more than 80,000 Americans have died. "Maybe that's a question you should ask China," Trump told Jiang. "Don't ask me. Ask China that question, OK?" And that was the beginning of the end of the press conference.

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Violence Against Asian Americans Is on the Rise -- But It's Part of a Long History
If you somehow think the rise of anti-Asian sentiment amidst COVID-19 is something new, take short and long look back at the history of Asians in America -- something you can see in the epic new five-hour documentary series Asian Americans, which premieres on PBS this week. All five parts are available for viewing in their entirety on pbs.org.

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Kevin Kwan's New Book is His Most Decadent Yet
How do you follow up one of the most successful trilogies of the 21st century? For Kevin Kwan, whose Crazy Rich Asians books have sold millions of copies and spawned a $200-million-plus movie, the answer rested in his greatest inspiration: A Room With a View. His new novel, Sex and Vanity, plays like a straight tribute to the E.M. Forster novel -- but in this version, the story moves between Capri and New York, tackling the nuances of Asian American identity in the process.

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API Heritage Jam
DJs Phatrick and O-Dub are teaming up for a livestream mix highlighting Asian and Asian American artists. Wednesday, May 13 at 4pm Pacific. Follow along on Instagram Live at either @djphatrick or @soulsides.

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CAAMFest Online: Heritage at Home
The Center for Asian American Media presents their reimagined festival experience, CAAMFest Online: Heritage at Home from May 13-22. The online festival will provide a platform to gather virtually in celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. The program features over 20 digital events, ranging from online film screenings to interactive panels, watch parties, and house parties with live performances, all free of charge. Learn more and reserve your tickets here. Join the conversation using #CAAMFestOnline and #HeritageAtHome.


They Call Us Bruce - Episode 98: They Call Us Renee Tajima-Pena

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

On this episode, we welcome Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Renee Tajima-Pena, producer of the epic new PBS documentary series Asian Americans. She talks about finding the stories that don't make it into textbooks, how history repeats itself, and the challenges of condensing 150 years of history into a five-hour public television series.

5.10.2020

Read These Blogs



Daniel Dae Kim on 'Asian-Americans': Ugly History, Relevant Again
Daniel Dae Kim, who narrates the PBS documentary series Asian Americans, discusses its unanticipated resonance in the age of Covid-19 and his own experiences with the disease.

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Alison Roman, the Colonization of Spices, and the Exhausting Prevalence of Ethnic Erasure in Popular Food Culture
I guess we need to talk about Alison Roman.

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20+ Allyship Actions for Asians to Show Up for the Black Community Right Now
In light of #AhmaudArbery and ongoing police violence, how can the Asian and Asian American community show up for our Black siblings?

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Breaking the cycle of discrimination against Asian Americans
Hate crimes against Asians are rising in part because of our racist president. It's time to break the cycle.

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I'm Teaching From Home and Don't Know How Long We Can Keep This Up
My students are stressed, their families are sick, and teachers like me are trying to hold it all together.

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The Path to Survival Is Even More Complicated for Immigrant-Owned Mom-and-Pop Restaurants
Mom-and-pop diners and family-run takeout spots are especially vulnerable to the challenges ahead set by COVID-19. Caught between the bodily risk of coronavirus exposure on one end and the threat of losing the culmination of a lifetime of labor and sacrifice, they face an impossible choice: to close or to stay open?

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Yuh-Line Niou Is Fighting For Chinatown's Survival
Yuh-Line Niou, the first Asian American Assemblywoman in Manhattan, and the first Asian American legislator that Chinatown has ever had in the state legislature, is facing an existential crisis and fighting for justice for all.

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Social Distancing Feels A Lot Like My Immigrant Childhood. Here's How.
"When you're trained to keep your distance within the same household, keeping six feet away from strangers is a piece of cake."

* * *

Northwestern's Asian American Studies Hunger Strike, 25 Years Later
How student activism and appetite slowly built an ethnic studies program at Northwestern.

* * *

Love In The Shape Of Cut Fruit
"Life is filled with bitter and hard things. When you extract pits, piths, and peels, fruit becomes a reliable source of pure sweetness, only softness."

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By feeding my sister, a new mother, I found a new way to connect
Soleil Ho didn't always have a close relationship to her sister. But after her sister had her first baby, she found a new way to communicate care.

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Making the Past Present
Driveways director Andrew Ahn processes the death of his grandmother and actor Brian Dennehy by revisiting their performances in his films.

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How Andrew Ahn Turned 'Driveways' Into a Nuanced Portrait of Asian American Family
For his Spa Night follow-up, Andrew Ahn told IndieWire he was pleasantly surprised when producers agreed to his suggestion to make Driveways' two leads Asian.

* * *

Why does 'yellow filter' keep popping up in American movies?
Hollywood loves to use the "yellow filter" in movies that take place in India, Mexico, or Southeast Asia. Why?


5.08.2020

Ignore Asian American Voters at Your Own Peril

And Other Things to Know From Angry Asian America.



Asian Americans Are the Fastest-Growing Group in the U.S. Electorate
Asian Americans are the fastest-growing segment of eligible voters out of the major racial and ethnic groups in the United States. More than 11 million will be able to vote this year, making up nearly 5% of the nation’s eligible voters (for this analysis, U.S. citizens ages 18 and older). They are also the only major racial or ethnic group in which naturalized citizens -- rather than the U.S. born -- make up a majority of eligible voters, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data.

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Motoko Fujishiro Huthwaite, 92, Last of the 'Monuments Women,' Dies
Motoko Fujishiro Huthwaite, part of a team of 345 people from 14 countries -- collectively known as the Monuments Men and Monuments Women -- who preserved cultural treasures and artworks during and after World War II, died on Monday in Michigan, from complications of the coronavirus. She was 92.

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The Paper Tigers Official Teaser
Martial arts movie fans, check out the first official teaser trailer for The Paper Tigers, an indie kung fu flick written and directed by Tran Quoc Bao. The action dramedy follows a deadbeat dad, an insurance scammer, and an MMA coach who must avenge their Kung Fu master's death. But first they need to call in sick at their 9-to-5s. The film is currently in post-production. For more info and updates, check out the official website.

* * *


Cambodian Rock Band Cast Recording
New York's Signature Theatre just released the cast recording of its production of Lauren Yee's Cambodian Rock Band, featuring songs by Dengue Fever. The play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia's most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. If you've seen the show and love the music, or if you haven't seen the show and just like dope music, check it out. Get it on Amazon, iTunes, Spotify, and wherever music is sold.

* * *


Jimmy O Yang: Good Deal
Comedian Jimmy O Yang's standup special Good Deal is now available on Amazon Prime. Performed live at the Neptune Theater in Seattle, Good Deal covers Jimmy's hilarious interactions with fans, his thoughts on Matt Damon, and whether ghosts will haunt one-bedroom apartments.


Angry Reader of the Week: Joshua Kwak

"Be patient with me I'm still sharpening my voice."



Hey, everybody! Let's get it together because it's time to meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Joshua Kwak.

5.07.2020

Three Teens Arrested in Attack on Asian Woman in St. Paul

And Other Things to Know From Angry Asian America.



Three Arrested in St. Paul LRT Station Attack
Police have arrested three teenagers following an attack on an Asian woman on a train platform in St. Paul. Video of the assault, which was shared widely across social media, shows one of the teens kicking the victim in the head. The attack was never reported, but transit authorities were able to identify the assailants using surveillance footage. They're still reportedly trying to identify the victim.

* * *



Asian American Woman Harassed by Self-Identified Trump Supporter
A San Francisco resident who faced anti-Asian harassment while walking her dogs is speaking out, urging those who witness such xenophobia to step in to help. Amanda Law said she was near the Great Highway last month when a woman approached her to ask why she wasn't staying home. In video of the incident, recorded by Law, the woman can be seen walking toward the camera, asking why Law "doesn't go back to where she came from," as passersby stepped in and told the woman not to harass her. The video shows the woman continuing to walk toward the camera. "Americans said we don't want you here," the woman said later in the video. "That's why we elected President Trump." Yup, that's why.

* * *



Family of 5 Doctors Loses Both Father and Daughter to Coronavirus
A father and a daughter, both of whom were doctors, died from COVID-19 and were honored by New Jersey governor Phil Murphy at Thursday's daily briefing for their contributions. Dr. Satyender Dev Khanna and his daughter Dr. Priya Khanna were remembered by Murphy at the daily briefing as selfless healthcare heroes, who dedicated their lives to helping others. They leave behind the elder Khanna's wife and two daughters. All three are also physicians.

* * *



Helpers in the Time of Coronavirus< The latest episode of the podcast Asian Americana explores the stories of Asian Americans working to defend our communities from attacks, the volunteers organizing direct aid to vulnerable populations, the people translating information into terms and languages so more can understand, and the local businesses helping each other and their communities survive during Covid-19.

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Driveways
The indie drama Driveways, directed by Andrew Ahn, is now available to download and stream. Hong Chau stars as Kathy, an acerbic, world-weary woman who travels with her young son to her deceased sister’s house to take care of her affairs. While there, her son strikes up a friendship with Del (the late Brian Dennehy, in one of his final lead roles), a gruff retiree who lives next door, who is estranged from his queer daughter. The film talks about loss in an open and frank way and shows that kindness and community are integral to moving on.


They Call Us Bruce - Episode 97: They Call Us Andrew Ahn

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

On this episode, we welcome Andrew Ahn, director of the feature drama Driveways, starring Hong Chau. He talks about making a movie to come out to his parents, getting accepted to the "Harvard" of film festivals, and working with the late Brian Dennehy on one of his last roles.

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