9.20.2017

Asian American family receives hate mail for posting Black Lives Matter sign

San Francisco home targeted with racist, threatening hate letters.



An Asian American family in San Francisco has been the target of racist, threatening hate mail since putting up a sign in support of "Black Lives Matter" in their window. But they're not backing down.

San Francisco Couple Threatened Over 'Black Lives Matter' Sign Display

Debbie Lee says she has had the sign up in the front window of her Forest Knolls/Twin Peaks home since 2015. But over the summer, she started receiving threatening letters about the sign.

The first letter showed up in her mailbox in July. Postmarked with no return address, it declared "BLUE LIVES MATTER! Get rid of your sign or WE will!" By the way, that's a threat.

The second letter said, "It's time to replace your BLM sign. How about CHINK LIVES MATTER."

When Asian Parents Retire... and Start Cosplaying

Steven and Millie Tani are having a blast dressing up as their favorite pop culture characters.



They say that the couple that cosplays together stays together. Meet Steven and Millie Tani, a retired couple that spends their leisure time getting dressed up as their favorite pop culture characters.

The couple, who have been married for 27 years, caught the cosplaying bug three years ago when they needed costumes for Halloween event at Disneyland. They went as Carl and Ellie from Pixar's Up.

Since then, the Southern California couple has suited up as everything from Captain America and Agent Carter to Han Solo and Princess Leia, traveling to events and conventions around the state.

Their daughter, a veteran cosplayer herself, suggested they document their newfound hobby on social media. You can view fun photos of Steven and Millie's costume exploits on CosplayParents.

9.19.2017

Brazilian tennis player fined for making racist gesture

You know exactly what gesture I'm talking about.



A Brazilian tennis player has been fined for making a racist gesture while playing against a Japanese opponent during a Davis Cup match in Osaka. You know exactly what gesture I'm talking about.

Guilherme Clezar: Brazilian tennis player fined for 'offensive' gesture

Brazil's Guilherme Clezar made a gesture during a match against Japan's Yuichi Sugita on Friday. Clezar stretched his eyes in the direction of a line judge after successfully challenging a line call.

Because that was definitely the mature, sportsmanlike thing to do.

Actually, no. Clezar was fined £1,100 (about $1,500 US) by the International Tennis Federation for "unsportsmanlike conduct." Yes, at minimum. I would actually characterize it as "racist as shit."

9.18.2017

A Call to Action by Jay Hirabayashi, Holly Yasui, and Karen Korematsu

By Jay Hirabayashi, Holly Yasui, and Karen Korematsu. Cross-Posted from Stop Repeating History!


Karen Korematsu (left), Holly Yasui (middle), and Jay Hirabayashi on a panel at the 2013 JANM National Conference. (Photo via DiscoverNikkei.org.)

A Call to Action: Reject the Shameful Legacy of Japanese American Incarceration and Call Upon the U.S. Supreme Court to Fulfill Its Role as Defender of the Constitution

Riz Ahmed is the first Asian actor to win an Emmy

Other notable winners include Lena Waithe and Aziz Ansari for 'Master of None.'



On Sunday at the 69th annual Emmy Awards, Riz Ahmed won Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie for his starring role as an accused murderer in HBO's limited series crime drama The Night Of.

That makes Ahmed the first man of Asian descent to take home a trophy at the Emmys, and only the second Asian performer ever to win, following Archie Panjabi's win for The Good Wife in 2010.

The Night Of is an eight-part miniseries that follows the intricate story of a murder case in New York City. Ahmed received critical praise for his star-making turn as Nasir "Naz" Khan, a Pakistani American college student accused in the grisly murder of a mysterious young woman after a night gone wrong.

"Wow. This is a tremendous honor to be recognized along so many actors who I've watched for so long." Ahmed said in his acceptance speech. "If this show has shone a light on some of the prejudice in our society, Islamophobia, some of the injustice in our justice system, then maybe that's something."

The Pakistani British actor and emcee also specifically credited the organizations South Asian Youth Action and The Innocence Project for helping him prepare for the role.

9.17.2017

Read These Blogs


Lessons From the World War II Experiences of Japanese Americans for Today's Muslim Americans: "Our political leaders should listen to Americans of Japanese ancestry who have personal experience with the dangers of racial prejudice and wartime hysteria. Our family stories contain profound lessons that must be retold to safeguard the constitutional liberties of all Americans."

* * *

Just Like My Mother: How We Inherit Our Parents' Traits and Tragedies: My-Linh Le is discovering the ways in which she has inherited and manifested some of her refugee parents' spoken and unspoken traumas.

* * *

A lot of white supremacists seem to have a weird Asian fetish: From David Duke to Charleston church shooter Dylann Roof, a lot of white supremacists seem to have an unlikely Asian fetish. What gives?

* * *

Two Asian-Americans On Growing Up In The Midwest vs. Chinatown: What it's like being one of a few Asian-Americans in school, contrasted with having a whole community you relate to.

* * *

Remembering Betty Ong: On September 11, 2001, flight attendant Betty Ann Ong heroically notified the American Airlines ground crew of the hijacking situation on board Flight 11, relaying vital information until the plane crashed into the World Trade Center.

* * *

We Need More Filmmakers Like Justin Lin to Explore Asian-Americana: Justin Lin is going back to his Asian American underdog roots with his new Chinatown bank prosecution picture.

* * *

"I've Always Been Political": Celeste Ng and Nicole Chung in Conversation: On transracial adoption, social media and Ng's new novel Little Fires Everywhere.

* * *

Michelle Yeoh Sheds Light on Captain Georgiou, Discovery: Michelle Yeoh, who plays Captain Phillippa Georgiou of the U.S.S. Shenzhou, talks about taking on the captain's chair on Star Trek: Discovery.

* * *

TOKiMONSTA Lost Speaking and Musical Abilities After Brain Surgery. This Is How She Regained Them.: Last year, Jennifer Lee, AKA TOKiMONSTA, had two brain surgeries that left her temporarily unable to comprehend language, walk, and -- worst of all to her -- understand music.

* * *

Marjorie Liu on the Road to Making Monstress: Acclaimed comic book writer Marjorie Liu discusses working for Marvel, the loneliness of novel-writing, and why her epic-fantasy series Monstress is mostly populated by women and characters of color.

* * *

Dream Casting: The All-Asian New Super-Man: Syfy's "Dream Casting" imagines who they'd like to see starring in a hypothetical movie version of Gene Luen Yang's New Super-Man, aka the "Chinese Superman."



9.15.2017

They Call Us Bruce - Episode 22: They Call Us #ExpressiveAsians

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. Each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

This week, we talk TV and #ExpressiveAsians with Nancy Wang Yuen, author of the book Reel Inequality: Hollywood Actors and Racism, and co-author of "Tokens on the Small Screen," a comprehensive new study on the state of AAPI representation on television.

The Great Failed Spam Heist of Ewa Beach

Thieves thwarted while attempting to steal 18 cases of Spam from a Hawaii drug store.



It wasn't exactly a fool-proof plan, but you have to appreciate the audacity of these thieves, just a little bit. This week in Hawaii, three women were thwarted while trying to steal 18 cases of Spam.

3 women attempt to steal 18 cases of Spam at Ewa Beach Longs

According to KITV, the attempted Spam heist occurred at a Longs Drugs store in Ewa Beach, where a trio of shoplifters tried to roll off with 18 cases -- that's 216 cans -- of everybody's favorite canned cooked meat.

The thieves were thwarted when a watchful customer noticed the shopping cart full of Spam while hanging out in cereal aisle. He got suspicious and staked out the store's exit to see what was up.

"I didn't say anything. I just stood by the door and the person that was trying to steal all the Spam just pushed the wagon and said 'Here!'" Kurt Fevella told KITV.

Angry Reader of the Week: Lena Khan

"I'm all about trying. I don't know if everything succeeds, but I try a lot."



Greetings, good people of the internet. It is time to meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Lena Khan.

Breaking Stereotypes When It Matters Most

Heroes from Houston's restaurant industry step up during Hurricane Harvey. Guest Post by Thomas Nguyen.



Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas on August 25, 2017, and is likely to be the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history. Harvey dumped more than 50 inches of rainfall in Houston, Texas, causing catastrophic flooding and damage to over 200,000 homes and businesses.

With over 12,000 restaurants that include everything from Ethiopian, Pakistani, barbeque, Viet-Cajun, Tex-Mex, to South African, Houston has unofficially become the most diverse city in America. But what makes Houston unique isn't just the diversity of cultures and people, it is seeing everyone come together in times of tragedy, catastrophe and chaos. Among the overwhelming number of inspirational and heroic stories during Harvey these past few weeks were chefs, owners and volunteers from Houston's burgeoning restaurant industry.

A handful of these stories involving Asian Americans stood out to me. Not because they were more significant than any others, but because they demonstrated traits that went against typical Asian American stereotypes. These individuals were not weak, silent or passive. They were leaders, they were compassionate, and they wholeheartedly contributed to those who needed help.

9.14.2017

George Takei to guest star on 'Fresh Off The Boat'

Iconic 'Star Trek' actor will play "a charming ESL instructor."



Sooner or later, it had to happen, right? Sulu, meet the Huangs. Legendary Star Trek actor George Takei will guest star on an upcoming fourth season episode of the ABC comedy Fresh Off The Boat.

George Takei to Guest Star on 'Fresh Off the Boat'

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the iconic actor and activist will play Bernard, "a charming ESL instructor for whom Grandma Huang (Lucille Soong) has a sweet spot." Love it. Ah, Uncle George, always the charmer.

9.12.2017

You can get a life-size cardboard Rose from 'Star Wars'

If that's your thing.



Hey, superfans. I just thought everyone would want to know that right now on Amazon, you can order a life-sized cardboard standup of Kelly Marie Tran as Rose from Star Wars: The Last Jedi. If that's your thing.

Rose Tico is described as "a gearhead, a greasemonkey, a behind-the-scenes jack-of-all-trades" in the Resistance who gets pulled into an adventure with Finn. Based on all the information and marketing that's been released so far, she's apparently Episode VIII's biggest new character -- and worthy of a cardboard cutout.

The Tokens, The Invisible and The Stereotyped: AAPIs on TV!

Comprehensive new report details the state of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders on television.



If you've watched any amount of television, I don't think you really needed a study to figure this one out, but it certainly helps to back it up with the numbers. A new study, Tokens on the Small Screen, reports on the ongoing representation of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders on prime time television and streaming television. The report concludes that while AAPI actors have increasing opportunities today, AAPIs are still underrepresented on television and their characters remain marginalized and tokenized on screen.

"With successful shows like Master of None and Fresh Off The Boat on the air, it may seem like Asian Americans are making greater strides on television," says report co-author Christina B. Chin, Assistant Professor at CSU Fullerton. "Yet, when we take a deeper look at the larger TV landscape, we start to see that these shows are the exception rather than the rule; Asian American and Pacific Islander actors and their stories are still tokenized or missing."

Following up and expanding on their 2005 and 2006 studies of AAPIs in prime time television, scholars from six California universities painstakingly evaluated broadcast, cable and streaming televising scripted shows airing between September 1, 2015 and August 31, 2016. (That is a lot of television.) In the most comprehensive report on this topic to date, the authors detail how AAPI series regulars fare in numbers settings, screen time, relationships, stereotypes and storylines.

Here are some key findings of the report:

Korean Drama Podcast - Boys Over Flowers #15

A K-Drama re-watch podcast by (and for) people who don't watch Korean dramas.



Are you a fan of Korean dramas? Then this podcast is probably not for you. The Korean Drama Podcast is the K-Drama rewatch podcast by (and for) people who don't watch Korean dramas.

In season one, host Will Choi (founder of Asian AF) and I -- both self-professed Korean drama beginners -- with help and hand-holding by our resident K-Drama expert Joanna Lee, attempt to watch and discuss the 2009 megahit drama Boys Over Flowers in its entirety, episode by episode.

In this episode, our heroes wrap up their adventures in Macau and return to birthday parties, new jobs, and ... MORE DRAMA! We struggle between rooting for the relationships the show wants us to root for and the relationships we actually want to root for. Also: a (very) in-depth discussion on public restrooms.

9.11.2017

The Comedy Comedy Festival: A Comedy Festival 2017

Family Reunion Storytelling: All Stars (September 21) & Disoriented AF (September 23)



If you're in Los Angeles and looking for some laughs, do not miss the The Comedy Comedy Festival: A Comedy Festival 2017. Scaled back from previous years, this mini-festival features two fun shows: a special "All-Star" edition of Disoriented Comedy's storytelling show Family Reunion and the variety comedy show Disoriented AF, with standup, improv, sketch and special guest storyteller Kelly Marie Tran.

It's going to be fun! Family Reunion is going down on Thursday, September 21 at the Lyric Hyperion Theatre & Cafe, while you can catch Disoriented AF on Saturday, September 23 at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center in Little Tokyo. Here are some more details:

Daniel Dae Kim to replace Ed Skrein in 'Hellboy'

Former 'Hawaii Five-0' actor in talks to play Ben Daimio in 'Hellboy: Rise of the Blood Queen.'



What. Are you telling me that an Asian American character will be played by an actual Asian American actor? That's wild! Daniel Dae Kim will reportedly star as Major Ben Daimio in the upcoming Hellboy movie reboot.

Daniel Dae Kim in Talks to Replace Ed Skrein in 'Hellboy' Reboot (Exclusive)

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Kim is talks to step into the role of Ben Daimio in Hellboy: Rise of the Blood Queen. Ed Skrein, who was originally signed on to play Daimio, dropped out of the project after an outcry over his casting -- yet another Asian character gets the Hollywood whitewash! In Mike Mignola's original Hellboy comic books, Daimio is Japanese American. Ed Skrein is... not.

This is more like it. Kim, who recently made headlines with his very public exit from Hawaii Five-0 after seven seasons, will play the severely scarred former marine officer who works for the Bureau of Paranormal Research and Defense. Due to supernatural encounter in the field, Daimio has the ability to transform into a monstrous, jaguar-like creature under extreme stress.

Damn, Daniel!

Autopsy: Tommy Le Shot Twice in Back by Police for Holding a Pen | #JusticeforTommyLe

By Jenn Fang. Cross-Posted from Reappropriate.



On June 14th, twenty-year-old Tommy Le was shot and killed just outside of Seattle, Washington by King County Sheriff’s deputy Cesar Molina. After the shooting, Molina insisted that Le was shot for approaching police aggressively while wielding an object that appeared to be a knife, and that Le further refused to comply with officer orders to drop the weapon.

That version of events is now in serious doubt after an investigation revealed that Le was actually holding a pen, not a knife, when he was shot and killed; and now, an autopsy of Le’s body further shows that Le was actually shot twice in the back, and a third time in the back of the hand. Those findings are incompatible with Molina’s insistence that Le was approaching police when he was killed.

Finally, toxicology reports show that Le was not under the influence of any drugs or alcohol. Although it remains possible that Le was suffering a mental health crisis at the time of his killing, Le’s family say that he had no history of mental illness.

9.10.2017

Read These Blogs


A casting director said Asian people weren't expressive and the response was amazing: Howw the hashtag #ExpressiveAsians took off over the weekend.

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The Scrutable West: Industry Bias, Whitewashing and the Invisible Asian in Hollywood: Excuses upon excuses. In 2017, Asian actors still haven't taken center stage in Hollywood.

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'Hellboy' Whitewashing Backlash May Signal Tipping Point for Hollywood Casting: Ed Skrein's move to exit Lionsgate's reboot could put actors and producers on notice about racial authenticity in film and TV, but "no one knows where the line is," says one publicity head.

* * *

Jagmeet Singh Explains Why He Didn't Tell That Heckler He's Sikh, Not Muslim: Canadian NDP leadership contender Jagmeet Singh has opened up about what was going through his mind when a heckler spewed ugly remarks at him during a campaign event last week.

* * *

'Dreamers' Put Their Trust in DACA. What Now? "It wasn't your choice to come to America. But once you realize you're here illegally, it becomes your choice to figure out who gets to know that."

* * *

You feel invisible': How America's fastest-growing immigrant group is being left out of the DACA conversation: Anthony Ng came to the U.S. from the Philippines at age 12 and now lobbies elected officials on policies to protect immigrant rights. Ng shares his thoughts on Trump's decision to end DACA.

* * *

When You're Queer And Undocumented, The DACA Stakes Are Higher: "For a lot of us, going back to our home countries isn't an option because of our queerness."

* * *

Philly Driver Shouts 'This Is America' To The Wrong Asian-American: "I know America in ways that you probably don’t and never will." Nydia Han responds to the driver who told her "This is America!"

* * *

San Jose Giants apologize for tone deaf' Japanese Heritage Night tweet: The San Jose Giants recently celebrated "Japanese Heritage Night" by tweeting out a photo of three team members in stereotypical garb and acting like idiots.

* * *

Homeless Man Broadcasts Live Daily from East Oakland Encampment: For the last month Derrick Soo has been streaming live segments from the East Oakland homeless encampment where he has lived since 2014 to document his journey to find permanent housing through a myriad of East Bay agencies.

* * *

How a Chinatown-by-the-Sea Popped Up on the Jersey Shore: A tuberculosis epidemic, a church, and one lucky break sent Chinese Manhattanites to Bradley Beach.

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The Search for Madame Liu-Tsong: In 1951, Anna May Wong was TV's first Asian-American leading actor. And then her groundbreaking show disappeared.

* * *

An Illustrated Guide to Escaping the Vietnam War and Making it in America: Thi Bui's graphic novel The Best We Could Do is a devastating -- and wholly human -- exploration of the wounds of war.



9.08.2017

They Call Us Bruce - Episode 21: They Call Us Dreamers

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. Each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

This week, we welcome Esther Yu-Hsi Lee, immigration reporter for ThinkProgress and a Dreamer herself, to discuss the personal and community impact of immigration policy on the heels of the Trump administration's decision to eliminate DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals).

Angry Reader of the Week: Travis Atreo

"Pretty much, if you're a person that has stopped learning then you make me angry."



Hey, everybody! You know what time it is. It is time, once again, to meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Travis Atreo.

9.07.2017

All of the Asian Star Wars Action Figures

A geeky portrait of every Asian action figure from the Star Wars saga.


Do you like Star Wars? Do you like Star Wars action figures? Our friend David Yeh really likes Star Wars action figures. He recently shared this awesome (and incredibly geeky) photo highlighting his collection of all the Asian characters -- yes, there have been a handful, major and laughably minor -- from across the entire Star Wars saga that have been produced over the years as action figures (including the recently released figures for Rose and Paige from the upcoming Last Jedi). There are only about a dozen, which, considering the massive number of Star Wars toys that have been produced in the last four decades, is not a lot.

Roll call, from left to right, with character and figure details:

9.06.2017

How To Pick Up Asian Chicks

Kristina Wong's hilarious webseries reviews self-published books on how to pick up Asian women.



How does one pick up Asian chicks? I can't tell you (but maybe don't refer to them as "Asian chicks," for starters). But maybe our friend Kristina Wong can illuminate the topic for us. The acclaimed comedian/performance artist has just launched an instructive new webseries How To Pick Up Asian Chicks.

Prepare to be schooled. But not in the way you think. Did you know that there are scores of self-published books out there, written by self-proclaimed "experts," on how to pick up Asian women? Titles like Everyman's Guide to Asian Sex, Asian MILF Hunting and How to Get an Asian Girlfriend. Actual books. But do they work?

(No.)

In six hilarious, 2-minute episodes, Kristina enlists the help of Asian American women to read, review and respond to actual excerpts from these books. Commentators include Asa Akira, Amy Hill, Aubrey Anderson-Emmons, Helen Hong, Jenny Yang, Lynn Chen, Michelle Krusiec, Tram Le, Victoria To Uyen, Erin O'Brien, Justina Walford, Heeli Kim-Jeng, Krista Suh, Molly Wedgwood, Miki Yamashita and Lianne Lin.

Check out all six episodes:

"No whitewashing allowed": 'Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet' is getting a movie adaptation

Jamie Ford's bestselling debut novel is being developed into a film, executive produced by George Takei.



Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, the best-selling debut novel by Jamie Ford, is being developed into a feature film, with none other than actor/activist George Takei serving as executive producer.

George Takei To Exec Produce 'Hotel On The Corner Of Bitter And Sweet'; Diane Quon & Joseph Craig Acquire Rights

The acclaimed 2009 novel follows Henry Lee, a Chinese American boy in Seattle who falls in love with Keiko, a Japanese American girl, as she is sent to an internment camp during World War II. Decades later, when the belongings of Japanese Americans families are discovered in the basement of an old hotel in Japantown, Henry must reconcile the past and the present, and confront the choices he made many years ago.

According to Deadline, producer Diane Quon has acquired the film rights with Joseph Craig of StemEnt. The film is scheduled to start production in 2018 with Ford co-writing the script.

9.05.2017

More Drama With Perm Boy's Mama: Korean Drama Podcast - Boys Over Flowers #14

A K-Drama re-watch podcast by (and for) people who don't watch Korean dramas.



Are you a fan of Korean dramas? Then this podcast is probably not for you. The Korean Drama Podcast is the K-Drama rewatch podcast by (and for) people who don't watch Korean dramas.

In season one, host Will Choi (founder of Asian AF) and I -- both self-professed Korean drama beginners -- with help and hand-holding by our resident K-Drama expert Joanna Lee, attempt to watch and discuss the 2009 megahit drama Boys Over Flowers in its entirety, episode by episode.

In this episode, more fun in Macau (including masks and gondola karaoke) and more drama with Perm Boy's mama! We discuss if it's possible to have a sudden change of heart. We also discuss where the Boys Over Flowers actors are now and imagine an alternate Korean drama following Pottery Boy and Ringo's action detective adventures.

9.04.2017

Trump Likely to End DACA - Here's What You Can Do Now

By Jenn Fang. Cross-Posted from Reappropriate.


Activists at the DREAM Action protest action in front of the White House on August 16, 2017.
(Photo credit: NAKASEC)

Politico broke the news earlier today that President Donald Trump has decided to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which had provided deportation protection and employment authorization for registered undocumented immigrants who had been brought to the United States as children. The program had been implemented by the Obama administration in 2012, and enjoys broad popularity in the United States.

Trump had promised to end DACA on the campaign trail, but had been flip-flopping on the issue since his inauguration. However, facing threats from the attorneys general of ten Republican states, Trump now appears to have decided to eliminate the DACA program, throwing the fate of over 700,000 so-called "Dreamers" -- including over 100,000 Dreamers from Asian countries -- into question.

9.03.2017

Read These Blogs


Look At These Reactions to The Tico Sisters Merch, and Then Try and Tell Me Representation Doesn't Matter: The newly released haul of Star Wars: The Last Jedi merchandise features action figures for two new characters: Rose and Paige Tico. In case you were wondering, it's kind of a big deal.

* * *

Houston, a Love Letter: A love letter to the city of Houston, from one of its daughters, Melissa Hung.

* * *

As You Were Saying: Asian groups need a voice: The practice known as "data disaggregation" would help all Asian Americans, yet there are several Chinese immigrant organizations that are wrongly labeling it "the new discrimination" and offensively likening it to "the atrocious Japanese Internment Camps and the Chinese Exclusion Act."

* * *

Portraits of Japanese American Activism: Realizing her proximity to a rich history of activism, photographer and director Zen Sekizawa has chosen to depict Japanese American activists and organizers in Los Angeles.

* * *

The Forgotten Chinese-American Family That Challenged Jim Crow: Three decades before the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision, Gong Lum v. Rice was the first case challenging the constitutionality of segregation in Southern public schools to reach the U.S. Supreme Court.

* * *

My relatives survived Hiroshima. I know the damage that Trump's nuclear rhetoric will cause. | Perspective: Rob Buscher's great-grandparents immigrated from Hiroshima in the 1920s, and he has several elderly relatives who survived the atomic bomb. Buscher warns against Trump's aggressive rhetoric with North Korea.

* * *

How do you make 5,000 people disappear?: Three words: by Executive Order. In August 1942, the U.S. Army removed a townful of people from Pomona, CA, forcing them to board a train to northwest Wyoming.

* * *

Meet the Chinese-American Journalist Leading The New Yorker Into the Future: An interview with Michael Luo, editor of The New Yorker's website.

* * *

Orientalism and Yellow Peril in "The Defenders": While the Netflix series The Defenders boasts a diverse cast of heroes, it also utilizes Orientalism as a plot device with a villanous network of Asians as the enemy.

* * *

Eddy Lee - Paving the Path in Hamilton and Beyond: Eddy Lee is the first Asian American male dancer in Hamilton. Here, Eddy talks about diversity, auditioning for this Broadway production, and his various other projects.

* * *

Why YouTube Megastar KevJumba Mysteriously Disappeared: Kevin Wu, aka KevJumba, became famous as a teen vlogger who broke out to earn roles in Hollywood. But in 2014, Wu went offline. What happened?

* * *

Actress Chloe Bennet Wants To Change The Narrative For Asian-Americans In Hollywood: Actress Chloe Bennet says changing her last name from Wang to Bennet allowed her to get more casting roles in Hollywood. While she did this, she says she hopes Asian American women that come after her do not have to take the same steps to find work.

* * *

Kevin Kwan: Americans will embrace 'Crazy Rich Asians' movie: Singaporean author Kevin Kwan believes that America will embrace the Crazy Rich Asians movie, which is based on his best-selling novel of the same name.



9.01.2017

Angry Reader of the Week: Michael Tow

"When we're angry we get our cast and crew together and we make films."



Greetings, good people of the internet. Here are we are with another Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Michael Tow.

8.29.2017

Why are these Asian Americans camped out in front of the White House?

Youth from NAKASEC and other groups are leading a 24-hour, 22-day vigil to defend DACA.



Right now, Asian American youth from NAKASEC (National Korean American Service & Education Consortium) and other groups are leading a 24-hour, 22-day vigil in front of the White House to call attention to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and defend thousands of immigrant youth who are under threat of deportation if the Trump administration should end the program.

DACA was initiated under President Obama in 2012. The executive order allowed undocumented youth to come forward, undergo a rigorous background check, pay a fee and receive temporary legal status that allows them to have work permits and drivers licenses. Since the program's inception, nearly 800,000 beneficiaries -- including 130,000 Asian Americans -- have been granted permission to live, work and study legally in America.

But now, DACA and the futures of thousands are at risk.

In June, a coalition of ten state attorney generals, led by Texas, threatened legal action if Trump didn't make moves to rescind DACA by September 5. As it stands, DACA is "currently under review," with an update expected any day now. Trump is reportedly leaning towards ending the program.

That's almost 800,000 people who came forward with the government's promise of protection who would now be at risk of deportation. Who would lose their jobs. Who would be forced back into the shadows.

Welcome to Macau: Korean Drama Podcast - Boys Over Flowers #13

A K-Drama re-watch podcast by (and for) people who don't watch Korean dramas.



Are you a fan of Korean dramas? Then this podcast is probably not for you. The Korean Drama Podcast is the K-Drama rewatch podcast by (and for) people who don't watch Korean dramas.

In season one, host Will Choi (founder of Asian AF) and I -- both self-professed Korean drama beginners -- with help and hand-holding by our resident K-Drama expert Joanna Lee, attempt to watch and discuss the 2009 megahit drama Boys Over Flowers in its entirety, episode by episode.

In this episode, we catch up with our plucky K-Drama heroes as we enter what is essentially "season 2" of Boys Over Flowers. Skipping ahead six months, we follow Jan Di to Macau in search of the Perm Boy who left her behind. Will also learns where and what a Macau is. Oh, and the mystery of the juk man deepens.

8.28.2017

Ed Skrein exits 'Hellboy' after whitewashing backlash

"It is our responsibility to make moral decisions in difficult times and to give voice to inclusivity."



Well, this is a surprise... Actor Ed Skrein has stepped down from his role in the upcoming Hellboy movie reboot after his casting set off massive outcry over yet another instance of Hollywood whitewashing.

Ed Skrein Exits 'Hellboy' Reboot After Whitewashing Outcry

News broke last week that Skrein had joined the cast of Hellboy: Rise of the Blood Queen as Major Ben Daimio, a character who is Asian American in the comic books. This, of course, unleashed all kinds of internet fury. A white guy takes a role that clearly should have gone to an Asian actor. We'd been down this road before.

But here's what we haven't seen: a white actor stepping down from a role out of conscience and solidarity. Skrein's exit from Hellboy has to be the first time an actor has removed himself from such a high-profile project in response to public criticism. Hey, Scarlett Johansson, take some notes.

Skrein announced that he was leaving the project on Twitter.

They Call Us Bruce - Episode 21: They Still Call Us Bruce

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. Each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

This week, having now ni hao'd their way into your hearts, we recap and revisit the first 20 episodes of They Call Us Bruce. Then they welcome friend and fellow podcaster Minji Chang (Kollabcast, First of All), for a round of The Good, The Bad and The WTF.

8.27.2017

Read These Blogs


Ali Wong Day Is An Official Holiday In San Francisco: All hail the Baby Cobra Queen of Comedy.

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questions on (the limits & effects of) (asian american) allyship: Hyejin Shim raises some important questions about Asian American activism, the pitfalls of replicating white allyship, and re-framing the ways in which Asian Americans can understand their power and the stories they tell.

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Eating Our Own: Deconstructing the Misogynistic Myths of Asian American Antifeminism: There's been a crop of antifeminist essays accusing Asian American women of many things, including supporting white supremacy in dating practices. Ju-Hyun Park identified and debunked some of the base assumptions, arguments, and outright myths of the Asian American antifeminist narrative.

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How Asian Immigrants Learn Anti-Blackness From White Culture, And How To Stop It: "It takes awareness and willingness to unlearn the false narratives we've been taught and recognize them as misguided fear passed down to us from our overprotective parents."

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Returning to My Father's Koreatown: Margaret Rhee looks back at family, food, and memories in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Koreatown.

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No, Where Are You Really From? CNN asked people to share their experiences of being questioned about where they are really from. The #whereimreallyfrom project is a collection of 2,000 stories.

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'Death Note's U.S. Setting Doesn't Excuse Its Total Erasure Of Asian-Americans: Netflix's new anime-inspired movie, Death Note, switched the setting from Japan to the U.S., whitewashing the main cast altogether.

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'Death Note' Is What Happens When Filmmakers Don't See Race: American adaptations need to realize that multiculturalism, not high production value, is its greatest strength.

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Kulap Vilaysack Will Take Over TV: Comedian and T.V. showrunner Kulap Vilaysack, creator of Bajillion Dollar Propertie$, has made it her mission to force Hollywood to address its race problem.

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The Village People Are Adding an Asian Construction Worker to Their 'Old and Tired' Lineup: The Village People just announced they are adding a new member to the group's lineup -- a hot Asian construction worker named James Kwong.

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YouTuber Jenn Im Just Launched A Clothing Line — & It's All Under-$80: Boasting just under two million YouTube subscribers and 1.5 million Instagram followers, fashion-turned-beauty-and lifestyle star Jenn Im is the latest social media star to launch her own clothing line.



8.25.2017

Angry Reader of the Week: Teresa Huang

"I've been described as 'awash in multitudes.'"



Hey, everybody! It is time, once again, to meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Teresa Huang.

Why does Hollywood keep whitewashing Asian characters?

'Hellboy' movie reboot casts Some White Dude as a Japanese American character.



At this point, they can't even pretend to give a shit.

This week, news broke that actor Ed Skrein has joined the cast of the upcoming Hellboy reboot, Rise of the Blood Queen, as Ben Daimio, who is Asian American in the comic books. Yes, in the illustrious Hollywood tradition of pretending Asian actors don't exist, yet another white guy will play an Asian character.

'Deadpool' Actor Ed Skrein Joining 'Hellboy' Reboot (Exclusive)

In the Hellboy comic books, Ben Daimio is a severely scarred former marine officer who works for the Bureau of Paranormal Research and Defense. Due to supernatural encounter in the field, he has the ability to transform into a monstrous, jaguar-like creature under extreme stress.

Daimio's Japanese American heritage actually plays a significant part in the character's development and backstory. In B.P.R.D.: Killing Ground, Daimio's loyalty is called into question when it is revealed that his grandmother was an Imperial Japanese agent known as The Crimson Lotus. As history has shown, Japanese Americans have a little experience with their loyalty being unjustly called into question by the government.

So yeah, this character is Asian American. But who the hell is Ed Skrein?

8.24.2017

103-year-old woman becomes U.S. citizen

Hong Inh was the oldest among 10,000 new Americans at Tuesday's naturalization ceremony in Los Angeles.



This week, a 103-year-old woman from Cambodia joined thousands of flag-waving folks at the Los Angeles Convention Center to take the oath of allegiance and become our nation's newest Americans.

Hong Inh, who survived years of war and violence under the Khmer Rouge regime in the 1970s, came to the United States when she 97 years old to join a daughter and other relatives.

She was the oldest of more than 10,000 people at Tuesday's naturalization ceremony. She was joined by three generations of her family, from her 80-year-old daughter to her 13-year-old great-granddaughter.

More here: 103-Year-Old Woman from Cambodia Becomes U.S. Citizen

8.23.2017

These Republicans are lousy at choosing their token Asians

Arizona GOP website displays family from Margaret Cho sitcom to represent Asian American interests.



It looks like Arizona Republicans are hard up for some Asian friends. In a spectacularly awful attempt to illustrate its diversity and support for Asian Americans, the Arizona Republican Party's official website prominently displayed a photo of a smiling Asian American family. Here's the problem: the family is fake. In fact, it's a cast photo of the fictional Kim family from Margaret Cho's short-lived 1994 sitcom All-American Girl.

Arizona GOP uses Margaret Cho sitcom pic to represent Asian Americans

For you young ones out there, decades before Fresh Off The Boat, ABC aired the very first sitcom featuring a Korean American family, starring rising standup comedian Margaret Cho. It made some waves, but for the most part it was not well received and was promptly canceled after a season. You heard it mentioned a lot in the hoopla as a predecessor to Fresh Off The Boat when that show hit the air a couple of years ago.

But it's pretty apparent that the show didn't have any fans among the Arizona GOP. Or they would have found a nonfictional or at least less recognizable Asian family to use as their token minorities.

ESPN pulls Virginia game announcer named Robert Lee

Because Robert Lee is too similar to Robert E. Lee.



Really? We live in ridiculous times.

ESPN decided to move an Asian American announcer, Robert Lee, off the University of Virginia's upcoming home opener football game against William and Mary, "simply because of the coincidence of his name."

Because Robert Lee is too similar to Robert E. Lee.

Earlier this month, violence erupted at a white nationalist rally that gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia to protest the removal of a statue of the Confederate general. The night before a counter-protestor was killed, white nationalists marched across the UVA campus, carrying torches and chanting racist slogans. So yeah, you could say it was a minor coincidence that a guy named Robert Lee was going to call the play by play.

That minor coincidence was enough for ESPN to reassign Lee to announce the Youngstown versus Pitt game being played on the same day. It was supposed to be a minor change -- reassignments happen all the time, and neither game is even scheduled to be televised. But then word of the network's switch leaked on Tuesday.

They Call Us Bruce - Episode 19: They Call Us Philip Ng

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. Each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

This week, we welcome actor Philip Ng, who stars as Bruce Lee in Birth of the Dragon. He talks about the premature controversy around the film -- it's not a biopic -- his approach to playing an icon, and some of the big differences between Hong Kong and Hollywood action.

8.22.2017

F4 To The Rescue: Korean Drama Podcast - Boys Over Flowers #12

A K-Drama re-watch podcast by (and for) people who don't watch Korean dramas.



Are you a fan of Korean dramas? Then this podcast is probably not for you. The Korean Drama Podcast is the K-Drama rewatch podcast by (and for) people who don't watch Korean dramas.

In season one, host Will Choi (founder of Asian AF) and I -- both self-professed Korean drama beginners -- with help and hand-holding by our resident K-Drama expert Joanna Lee, attempt to watch and discuss the 2009 megahit drama Boys Over Flowers in its entirety, episode by episode.

In this episode, we pick up from last episode's cliffhanger. Jan Di is rescued from the creepy model guy and the crew takes (another) trip to unwind, this time to the slopes! We talk about possessive gift giving, why Jun Pyo needs to stop trusting mean girls, Jan Di's fainting problem, cute DIY bentos, and consensual kissing!

8.21.2017

Restaurant calls customer "Ching Chong" on receipt

Manhattan's Cornerstone Cafe apologizes after racial receipt goes viral.



This again. It's the return of the Racial Receipt! The latest sighting occurred in New York, where a Manhattan restaurant recently apologized for referring to an Asian American customer as "Ching Chong" on a receipt.

Last Wednesday, a server at Cornerstone Cafe in the East Village entered an Asian customer's name as "Ching Chong" on the slip for a to-go order of steak and eggs. Because why bother asking for a customer's actual name when you can silently mock them with a racial slur, right under their nose?

The incident started picking up attention when a friend of the customer, Facebook user Ziggy Chau, posted a photo of the offending receipt on social media. That's when the internet went in on Cornerstone Cafe.

8.20.2017

Read These Blogs


Asian-American doctor says white nationalists refuse her care: Dr. Esther Choo is an Asian-American emergency room physician in Oregon who has practiced medicine for more than a decade. Yet, she says, a few times a year, a patient will refuse to let her treat them. Solely because of her race.

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We Must Stand Up for Dreamers and #DefendDACA: "Today, on the heels of nationwide vigils that spoke out against racism, people all around the country will stand up once again on behalf of Dreamers, young immigrants who face an uncertain future under President Trump and his administration. Just as we stood against white supremacists, we must stand with the Dreamers as well."

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Philly Councilwoman Helen Gym unflinching in calls to remove Rizzo statue: Philadelphia Councilwoman Helen Gym is calling for the city to take down a statue honoring Frank Rizzo, the late police commissioner and mayor who was known for sometimes brutal treatment of the black and gay communities.

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Behind a WWII internment camp's barbed wire, two Scouts forged a bond. It endured when they both entered Congress. Norman Mineta and Alan Simpson first met in middle-of-nowhere Wyoming in the 1940s, as two Boy Scouts at an internment camp for Japanese Americans. They met again in Congress, forming a bipartisan friendship that has endured into their 80s.

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What happened to Chicago's Japanese neighborhood? Chicago's Lake View neighborhood once had a thriving Japanese community, but it fell victim to a push for assimilation. As one Japanese-American puts it: "You had to basically be unseen."

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In Memoriam: Irene Cho and L.A. celebration of her life scheduled for August 26: Last week, the Asian American indie film community lost a friend and champion. Irene Cho, a pillar of the scene, died Wednesday after suffering a massive stroke. Anderson Le joins the chorus of friends offering their remembrances.

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After her life in L.A. unraveled, a woman living in her car hopes to regain health and employment: How did Megan Shimatsu, a college-educated, one-time middle-class Los Angeles native, daughter of Japanese immigrants, end up living out of her car while getting dialysis treatment for her failing kidneys?

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In 'Columbus,' John Cho Reckons With His Own First-Generation Culture Clash: On NPR's Fresh Air, actor John Cho talks about his latest film, Columbus, which explores the cultural chasms that exist between different generations of immigrant families.

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Justin Chon Gets Personal With "Gook," His New Film About the L.A. Riots: Actor and filmmaker Justin Chon, whose new film Gook is now in theaters, reflects on representation, casting his dad in a tough role, and what has and hasn't changed in the 25 years since the LA Riots.

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A Look Back at the Chinkees, the Ska Band that Reclaimed Asian Identity: The Slants aren't the first Asian American rock band to reclaim a racial epithet. The ska punk band the Chinkees, who the Slants have shouted out as an inspiration, began releasing music in 1998, skanking against ugly stereotypes and putting Asians on the forefront of American rock.



8.19.2017

Birth of the Dragon: "The Fight That Created The Legend"

SPONSORED POST



Set against the backdrop of 1960s San Francisco, Birth of the Dragon is a modern take on the classic movies that Bruce Lee was known for. It takes its inspiration from the epic and still controversial showdown between an up-and-coming Bruce Lee and kung fu master Wong Jack Man -- a battle that gave birth to a legend.

Before becoming a legendary icon, known to millions around the world, Bruce Lee was a driven young man working to establish himself as a top kung fu master. In 1964, everything changed for Lee when Wong Jack Man, a Northern Shaolin master from China, arrived in San Francisco and stepped forward to accept Lee's public challenge. Remarkably, the outcome of that ensuing confrontation was observed by only a handful of witnesses and, still hotly contested today, has taken on mythic proportions. But one thing appears certain: from that epic battle, Bruce Lee emerged as The Dragon -- the man who brought kung fu to the world.

Directed by George Nolfi, Birth of the Dragon is a lively imagining of that mythic fight. Philip Ng stars as the then unknown but irrepressibly talented Bruce Lee, and celebrated Chinese actor Xia Yu plays Wong Jack Man. The film also stars Billy Magnussen, Jingjing Qu, Jin Xing and Simon Yin.

Here's the trailer:

8.18.2017

Sound and Fury Podcast Episode 23: Justin Chon

Writer, Director and Star of 'Gook'



Aaaaand we're back. Sorry, it's been a minute. After a lengthy hiatus, my original interview podcast Sound and Fury is back! Hopefully, we'll get back on track, keep things regular and stick around for a while.

In Episode 23, I talk to actor and filmmaker Justin Chon about his award-winning indie film Gook. He explains why he wanted to make a movie set during the 1992 Los Angeles riots, his Korean American family's personal connection to the conflict, and his reasoning behind the film's controversial title.

Check it out:

Angry Reader of the Week: Ji-Yeon Yuh

"The mother of three children, a historian, an Asian American Studies scholar..."


Hello, internet friends. It it time, once again, to meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Ji-Yeon Yuh.

8.16.2017

"Ching Chong": Teens vandalize cemetery with racist graffiti

The NYPD is investigating the incident as a hate crime.



Because it's not enough to be racist against the living. These guys were racist against the dead too. This week in New York, three teens broke into a cemetery and vandalized dozens of grave sites in the Asian section, toppling headstones, breaking marble markers and scrawling racist graffiti throughout the grounds.

Vandals damage headstones, spray paint derogatory words in Brooklyn cemetery

Three suspects, who appear to be between 16 and 19 years old, broke into the Cypress Hills Cemetery in Brooklyn just after midnight on Tuesday and vandalized graves in an Asian section, another section and two memorial abbeys in the center of the grounds. According to the NYPD, the suspects knocked over 70 headstone, broke 15 marble memorial markers in a mausoleum, and spray-painted them with hate graffiti

The graffiti included "fuck Jackie Chan" and "ching chong" on a grave that appeared to originally have an Asian language on it, according to the NYPD. They also wrote the phrase, "fuck sand n--gers."

Police released a video of the suspects, who can be seen taking photos inside the cemetery:

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