5.15.2022

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Remembering a Victim of an Anti-Asian Attack, a Hundred and Fifty Years Later
Gene Tong, a popular herbal-medicine doctor in Los Angeles, was hanged by a mob during one of the worst mass lynchings in American history.

* * *

James Hong Really Is Everything, Everywhere, All at Once
The 93-year-old vet has more than 450 credits under his belt -- and, as of this week, a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

* * *

Smuggled, Heartbroken and Triumphant: How 3 Comics Tell the Immigrant Story
The profound and painful tribulations of the Asian American journey are centered in Asian American Eyz'd: An Immigrant Comedy Special — a film project by Ana Tuazon Parsons, Nicky Endres and Aidan Park.

* * *

How TikTok's king of poses teaches his 4 million followers to take better photos
Photographer David Suh teaches his 4 million TikTok followers how to pose with confidence.

* * *

In their search for love, South Asians swipe right on dating apps catered for them
Mirchi is among the growing world of dating apps created by and catering to South Asians.

* * *

Ellen Pao on What Asian American Women Need from Workplaces
TIME talked to four Asian American women who have built successful careers within their own industries while advocating alongside other AAPI professionals to build better workplaces for their communities.


5.08.2022

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The term 'Asian American' has a radical history
"Asian American" is a term that is both ambitious and contentious, depending on who you ask... There are significant limitations to a single category that encompasses such a vast and diverse population. But despite its imperfect nature, scholars of Asian American history say that the term's origins suggest that it has immense potential, too.

* * *
More people now incorrectly blame Asian Americans for Covid than at height of pandemic
A new report finds that the percentage of Americans who say Asian Americans are responsible for Covid-19 nearly doubled from 2021 to 2022.

* * *
Horrified by the surge of anti-Asian violence, she's giving her community tools to protect themselves
Medical studnet Michelle Tran was horrified by the spike in anti-Asian violence and wanted to do something to help her community. She co-founded Soar Over Hate, a nonprofit that works to support and protect AAPI communities in New York and San Francisco.

* * *
A Story of Succession on a New Jersey Farm, in 'Seasons'
Nevia No's mother, who emigrated from what is now North Korea, was embarrassed of her chosen profession as a farmer; in turn, Gabriella Canal and Michael Fearon's documentary about Bodhitree Farm focusses on Nevia’s desire to pass on her work to her own daughter.

* * *
Some of the Most Influential Asian American Literature of All Time
"This post was originally going to be called 'The Most Influential Asian American Literature of All Time' but who on earth could write that post?"

* * *
From ‘Turning Red’ to ‘Everything Everywhere,’ the Asian (North) American mom goes mainstream
Imperfect, complex Asian American moms are the center of many recent mainstream narratives.

* * *
Wayne Wang Still Isn't Satisfied
On the 40th anniversary of his breakthrough drama, Chan Is Missing, director Wayne Wang says a new generation of Asian American filmmakers must make more challenging work.

* * *
Memories of a Vibrant Moment in Asian American Cinema
"To understand our contemporary moment, we must look back at the 1980s and ’90s, when cultural media organizations and film festivals that supported Asian American filmmakers robustly programmed a diversity of aesthetic approaches."

* * *
Young Hollywood Was Asian
The playboys, half-castes, outsiders, and sirens who made motion pictures.

* * *
'Fresh Off the Boat' Was Just the Start
Though Fresh Off the Boat has ended, executive producers Jake Kasdan and Melvin Mar are continuing to lead TV’s expansion in Asian American and Pacific Islander representation.


5.01.2022

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Column: What we got wrong about Black and Korean communities after the L.A. riots
"Korean immigrants left their homeland trying to achieve it, and many lost their belief in it after the riots. But was the American dream ever real if Black people never had equal access to it?"

* * *

Op-Ed: For my Korean-Black family, the aftermath of the L.A. riots cut deep
Helena Ku Rhee remembers her cousin Louise and the rift that the L.A. uprisings caused within her family.

* * *

Charges of racism and red-baiting in race for congressional seat created to elevate Asian Americans A new Southern California congressional district was created expressly to empower Asian Americans. But the race to represent the district has turned into a mud-slinging battle rife with accusations of racism, sexism and red-baiting between two Asian American candidates.

* * *

Can Nail Techs Win Better Working Conditions?
They hope legislation will establish standards for safety and determine wages and benefits.

* * *

I Made My Mom See "Everything Everywhere All At Once" And We Both Cried
After Scaachi Koul made her mom watch the film, she prodded her to discuss intergenerational trauma.

* * *

The Guardian of Bruce Lee's Legacy
Jeff Chin has dedicated his life to promoting the martial arts legend’s philosophy of pride and self-love.

* * *

What do Olivia Rodrigo, Saweetie, H.E.R., Bruno Mars, Elle King and Remy Martin have in common? Me.
"Filipino Americans are not easily categorized. But we still need to see our dreams being lived by people who share our heritage."

* * *

How the AAPI Community Is Redefining the Humble Fortune Cookie Fortune cookie makers have turned the confection into a medium for social activism.


4.24.2022

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This movie's Asian American metaphor is a message to the not-so-United States
"Everything Everywhere All at Once is absurd, exhilarating, and enrapturing. And it's a startlingly perfect metaphor for this thing we call Asian America, a culture and identity."

* * *

A Daring Dream and a Lifelong Love, Dashed in a Moment of Violence
GuiYing Ma built a modest life of service in New York until a shocking attack tore her from her devoted husband.

* * *

'The fear is very real': how Asian Americans are fighting rising hate crime
As the fastest growing racial or ethnic group in the United States, Asian Americans are finally in a position to do more than stock up on pepper spray and hope for the best.

* * *

"Multiple Things Can Be True": Understanding the Roots of Anti-Asian Violence
A conversation with public defender Jason Wu, who says if we do not learn from history, we risk misdiagnosing the problems -- and applying remedies that will continue to fail us.

* * *

The art gallery where Christina Yuna Lee once worked honors her life and legacy
Christina Yuna Lee was brutally murdered two months ago. The art gallery she once worked at opened an exhibition in her memory.

* * *

I'm Jeff Yang, not Jeff Chang! The everyday horror of having to say 'Sorry, wrong Asian'
Jeff Yang asks Asian Americans to share their funny-not-funny stories of being mistaken for other people.

* * *

Asian Men Needed a Movie Like Everything Everywhere All at Once
It took a reality-transcending action dramedy to create more realistic representation.

* * *

"Everything" star Stephanie Hsu on playing all-powerful: "We would just unleash ultimate chaos"
Stephanie Hsu, who plays both Joy and Jobu Tupaki in Everything Everywhere All at Once, talks about learning to punch Michelle Yeoh, and the wisdom of Jamie Lee Curtis and rocks.

* * *

Ronny Chieng Will Use His Platform However He Sees Fit, Thank You
In conversation about his new Netflix special, The Daily Show tenure, and the current "moment" in Asian Hollywood, comedian Ronny Chieng reflects on his comedian duty toward provocation.


4.21.2022

They Call Us Bruce 158: They Call Us Marvelous and the Black Hole

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome writer/director Kate Tsang and actress Miya Cech to talk about their film Marvelous and the Black Hole. They discuss making a different kind of Asian American coming-of-age movie, working with the inimitable Rhea Perlman, and mastering the secrets of sleight of hand.

4.17.2022

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How 'Everything Everywhere All at Once' Helps to Heal Generational Trauma
The film Everything Everywhere All at Once addresses how the effects of trauma are passed down between generations -- especially for Asian American women -- and gives a glimpse on ways to heal.

* * *

The Daniels on the ADHD theory of "Everything Everywhere All at Once," paper cuts and butts
Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert, aka Daniels -- the directing duo behind Everything Everywhere All at Once -- spoke to Salon about how their film embraces the profound and profane.

* * *

So You Want To Teach Asian American History? These Educators Are Here To Help
Around the country, thousands of K-12 teachers are signing up for training on the struggles and contributions of Asians Americans.

* * *

Traveling to a newly reopened Asia allowed me to be myself again
"After attacks and racism against Asian Americans like myself at home, I found relief on the other side of the world."

* * *

Ali Wong announces divorce from her husband — but media got the #WrongAsian
The news of Ali Wong's divorce from her husband Justin Hakuta was somewhat overshadowed by the fact that news outlets ran incorrect photos -- of Randall Park -- with their reporting.

* * *

Marvel turned Mandarin into 'gibberish.' Even one of its stars called it out
Viewers of Marvel's Moon Knight are calling out a scene in which a character purportedly speaks Mandarin, but apparently butchers the language into gibberish. Even Shang-Chi himself, Simu Liu, had words.

* * *

You Can Finally Watch the Long-Lost Indie That Showed Denzel Washington at Peak Hotness
Mira Nair on directing the actor at his most romantic in Mississippi Masala.


4.15.2022

They Call Us Bruce 157: They Call Us Michelle Yeoh

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome the legendary, incomparable Michelle Yeoh, star of Everything Everywhere All at Once. She talks about being the center of the multiverse, embracing absurdity, and playing a role unlike anything she's done before: the fantastically mediocre Evelyn Wang.

4.12.2022

They Call Us Bruce 156: They Call Us Daniel Kwan and Stephanie Hsu

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome writer/director Daniel Kwan (one-half of Daniels) and actress Stephanie Hsu to talk about everybody's new favorite film Everything Everywhere All at Once. They discuss meaningful pelvic thrusting, why Stephanie is actually a witch, and the exclusive secret origin of "Jobu Tapaki."

4.10.2022

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One Garment's Journey Through History
The evolution of the traditional Korean hanbok is a lens into the history of the country, which is now being traced in the series Pachinko.

* * *

Asian Americans are having 'the talk' about racism for the first time - with their parents
The rise in anti-Asian hate, fueled by misconceptions about the pandemic's origins, has exposed generational divides in how Asian Americans view racism.

* * *

Asian American wrongfully accused of spying recounts damage of racial profiling
"My lifetime of outstanding scientific work was destroyed. And my entire life was shattered."

* * *

Experts: Asian population overcount masks community nuances
Advocates and academics believe the overcounting of the Asian population by 2.6% in the 2020 Census likely masks great variation in who was counted among different Asian communities in the U.S., and could signal that biracial and multiracial residents identified as Asian in larger numbers than in the past.

* * *

The Mysterious Man Who Built (and Then Lost) Little Tokyo
The remarkable hidden history of Tony Yoshida, who transformed a single block in New York City, helped start the cocktail revolution -- and inspired John Belushi to become a samurai.

* * *

Kim’s Video Survives at Alamo Drafthouse
Youngman Kim explains to IndieWire his strange journey from growing up on an Air Force base in Korea to becoming the proprietor of a legendary movie collection.

* * *

'Everything Everywhere All At Once' Gives Us The Asian Woman Hero We Need
"In this time of elevated anti-Asian hate, we need the fully human -- and badass Evelyn Wang to uplift Asian women in the diaspora and help all audiences identify and empathize with Asian women."

* * *

Ke Huy Quan: From Short Round to Romantic Lead in Just Four Long Decades
A child star in the 1980s, Ke Huy Quan hit a dry patch and turned to stunt work in the 2000s. Now he has returned to acting in a part that blends his action and drama chops.

* * *

The one role out of more than 500 that's stuck with James Hong
93-year-old Hollywood legend James Hong, who appears in Everything Everywhere All At Once, talks about just how far Asian American representation has come.

* * *

Meet the self-trained martial artists who fought their way from YouTube to Everything Everywhere...
Why Hollywood filmmakers are battling to employ brothers Andy and Brian Le.

* * *

Next Big Thing: 'Pachinko' Star Minha Kim on Bringing History to Life
The relative newcomer Minha Kim drew on her grandmother's memories to play a Korean woman living under Japanese imperialism in Apple TV+'s epic new series Pachinko.

* * *

How Sandra Oh found common ground in the moms of 'Turning Red’ and ‘Umma’
Sandra Oh talks about the common mother-daughter themes that drew her to take on two very different projects, the horror drama Umma and Disney/Pixar's animated feature Turning Red.


4.08.2022

They Call Us Bruce 155: They Call Us Ke Huy Quan

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome a generational icon: Ke Huy Quan, who stars in the film Everything Everywhere All at Once. He talks about his humble beginnings as a child actor in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and The Goonies, how Crazy Rich Asians inspired his triumphant return to acting, and how to kick ass with a fanny pack (but not on the first take).

4.05.2022

They Call Us Bruce 154: They Call Us Everything Everywhere All at Once

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome back our old friends Rebecca Sun of The Hollywood Reporter and Dino-Ray Ramos of Diaspora to discuss our new favorite movie, Daniels' multiverse masterpiece Everything Everywhere All at Once. From Ke Huy Quan to butt plugs to hot dog hands, this film has it all and then some.


4.03.2022

Read These



This Southeast Asian Artist Uses Iconic Pink Doughnut Boxes as a Canvas for Storytelling
Phung Huynh expands on the refugee narrative by centering Khmer voices in her exhibition Donut Whole

* * *

Do Your AAPI Employees Feel Safe Coming Back to Work?
Because of an increase in racism, xenophobia, and hate crimes targeted specifically against the Asian American Pacific Islander community, many members are scared to come to work because they don't feel safe.

* * *

The Establishment of Emma Eun-joo Choi
NPR's newest—and youngest—podcast host Emma Eun-joo Choi considers the weight of her voice.

* * *

The Grammys Interview: Japanese Breakfast's Michelle Zauner Has Had Quite a Year
The best-selling author and frontwoman of Japanese Breakfast—who's up for two Grammys this weekend—reflects on her whirlwind literary and musical breakthrough.

* * *

Grieving His Mother's Death, Ocean Vuong Learned to Write for Himself
Ocean Vuong worked on his new poetry collection Time Is a Mother while mourning, in a world consumed by the advancing pandemic.

* * *

Everything Everywhere All at Once (2022)
Everything Everywhere All at Once is a love story between parents in a strange land and a daughter they're doing their best to rescue from alienation and depression. A review by Walter Chaw.

* * *

Five years ago, Ghost in the Shell accidentally destroyed a racist Hollywood tradition
The much-maligned Hollywood adaptation of the anime classic Ghost in the Shell inspired sweeping changes across the entertainment industry that are still felt today.

* * *

The Quiet Ascent of Justin H. Min
He found fame playing a ghost in Netflix's The Umbrella Academy. Now he's an android in After Yang, holding his own opposite Colin Farrell. In the human realm, though, he's simply Justin: an actor of rare and sensitive gifts, with deep and wide-ranging ambition, working hard to ready himself for his moment.


3.31.2022

They Call Us Bruce 153: They Call Us Turning Red

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome Shirley Li (The Atlantic) and Anita Li (The Green Line) to talk about Meilin Lee and Disney/Pixar's animated feature Turning Red. They discuss the incredible specificity of this Chinese Canadian story, what makes a film "relatable" and why it's so meaningful to let your teen girl characters go "AWOOGA!"


3.30.2022

Silent River Speaks: Getting into the Present with Chris Chan Lee

Guest Post by Jacqueline (Jae) Kim



It's September 2021, year two of the Coronavirus pandemic -- and the world premiere of Silent River at Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival (otherwise known as 'VC'). Among many of my friends, I haven't seen the director, Chris Chan Lee, in quite a while. After the film, I avoid the crowd and slip out but send Chris an email asking if he'd like to talk about his latest work via Zoom? I feel pretty sure the conversation will be something to document. Five months later, the film has been gaining critical momentum, earning its recent award at the Paris International Film Festival. Here's an excerpt:

Jae: Okay, so -- when I started getting involved with making my own films and eventually my own art projects, I started to see the processes and the results as self-diagnosis.

Chris Chan Lee: Mm.

Jae: How does that sit with you with regards to Silent River?

CCL: Well, you know, when I sit down to write, I never first think about the thematic content. I just think about, like telling the story, right? But I definitely notice a pattern with everything that I do that's not necessarily intentional: it's always about dealing with past and like regret and stuff like that. So that's always inherent in my work.

3.27.2022

Read These



What White Men Say in Our Absence
"I wonder if the men who attacked and killed us are the same men on the Internet who argue that we make better wives because we don't talk or fight back and that we make for easy sex because we are, after all, such easy prey."

* * *

Asian American Women Fight Back
At a self-defense class in New York after the latest anti-Asian attack, one student said, "I feel like I have an army of sisters."

* * *

Sisters Remember Growing Up In Their Parents' Hollywood Laundry Business
For StoryCorps, sisters Suzi and Donna Wong share stories of what it was like growing up just minutes from all the big movie studios in Hollywood, California... but a world away.

* * *

Ke Huy Quan on How 'Crazy Rich Asians' Gave Him FOMO
After a twenty-year hiatus due to limited roles for Asian actors, Ke Huy Quan returns to acting with a role in Everything Everywhere All at Once.

* * *

The Daniels see Everything Everywhere All at Once as a story about generational love
Directors Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert open up about crafting cinematic love letters.

* * *

Critics be warned: Turning Red is defiantly Asian and female – and there's more to come
Some commentators belonging to the Prime Demographic find they're unable to appreciate Turning Red's non-male, non-white protagonists.

* * *

'Licorice Pizza' made Asians a 'punchline.' And the fallout is bigger than the Oscars
Licorice Pizza's '70s coming-of-age dramedy includes some pretty cringe-worthy depictions of Japanese people.


3.20.2022

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Asian Americans Have Always Lived With Fear
"For some, deep down, my ordinary Korean face — small, shallow-set eyes, round nose, high cheekbones, straight dark hair — reminds them of lost wars, prostitutes, spies, refugees, poverty, disease, cheap labor, academic competition, cheaters, sexual competition, oligarchs, toxic parenting, industrialization or a sex or pornography addiction."

* * *

How the Atlanta Spa Shootings—the Victims, the Survivors—Tell a Story of America
The rampage killed eight people, including six Asian women. But the ripple effects go far, to other countries, continents, and immigrant histories.

* * *

How 'hiya,' 'kapwa' and other cultural values play a role in Filipino American mental health
A deep understanding of cultural values could help Filipino Americans receive mental health support.

* * *

"We're just trying to protect you."
A 20-year-old died of a GHB overdose in an older man's home. For two years, his family has called on police to reopen their investigation.

* * *

Michelle Yeoh Finally Loses Her Cool: "What Have I Got to Lose?"
The ballerina who became a beauty queen who became a Hong Kong martial arts star lets loose onscreen and gets the Hollywood top billing she's long deserved in the madcap metaphysical romp 'Everything Everywhere All at Once.'

* * *

What Turning Red means to me as an AAPI parent
For Clarissa Cruz, eeing a proudly nerdy Chinese Canadian 13-year-old with traditional parents and and supporting friends at the center of a Pixar movie was moving and important.

* * *

"Turning Red" Made Me Feel Understood As a Chinese American Teen
In this review of Pixar's Turning Red, 14-year-old film critic Tabitha Yuen explores how the new animated film accurately represents young Asian girls.


3.18.2022

They Call Us Bruce 152: They Call Us Iris K. Shim

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome Iris K. Shim, writer/director of the feature film Umma. She talks about working with the one and only Sandra Oh, incorporating traditional Korean cultural elements into a horror story, and whether or not her own umma will watch her movie.


3.17.2022

All The Asians On Star Trek 24: Jacqueline Kim

The Podcast In Which We Interview All The Asians On Star Trek.



All The Asians On Star Trek is the podcast in which we interview all the Asians on Star Trek. In Episode 22, we welcome actress Jacqueline Kim. She played the role of Ensign Demora Sulu -- daughter of Hikaru Sulu -- in the 1994 feature film Star Trek: Generations. Her other acting credits include Volcano, Disclosure, Xena: Warrior Princess, ER, The West Wing, Charlotte Sometimes and Advantageous, which she also co-wrote and produced. We discuss her brief stint at the helm of the Enterprise-B, her forays into domestic science fiction, and her evolution as a multi-disciplinary artist, including her recent work as a musician and composer.

3.13.2022

Read These



I'm Done Being Your Model Minority
Author Patricia Park rejects the model minority myth, especially during a rise in anti-Asian hate crimes.

* * *

She's Combating a Wave of Anti-Asian Hate
Cynthia Choi, an activist in San Francisco, anticipated the pandemic would lead to more attacks against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. She and others are documenting the surge.

* * *

How Did This Many Deaths Become Normal?
The U.S. is nearing 1 million recorded COVID-19 deaths without the social reckoning that such a tragedy should provoke. Why?

* * *

What therapist Christine Catipon tells her Filipino American clients
Clinical psychologist Christine Catipon knows it can be challenging for Filipino Americans to find therapists who come from the same cultural background.

* * *

In Another Life, Ke Huy Quan Was a Star
For his role in Everything Everywhere All at Once, '80s icon Ke Huy Quan called on his past selves.

* * *

With ‘Turning Red,' a Big Red Panda Helps Break a Glass Ceiling
Domee Shi is the first woman filmmaker with sole directing credit on a Pixar feature.

* * *

With Turning Red, Domee Shi Explores Uncharted Animated Waters
The director of Pixar's latest on the joys—and weight—of being a trailblazer.

* * *

The Difficulty of Being a Perfect Asian American
A book and a documentary examine how Asian Americans internalize the myth of the model minority.

* * *

Punk Rock's New Hope: The Ferocious, Joyful Linda Lindas
Fueled by punk conviction (and snacks), this all-girl, school-age band is ready to release its debut album, Growing Up, nearly a year after its song "Racist, Sexist Boy" went viral.

* * *

Shannon Dang "Lives Vicariously" Through Her Kung Fu Character's Wardrobe Shannon Dang, who stars as Althea on the hit CW show Kung Fu, is back for season two. And this time around, the acute attention to cultural details have been elevated even further.

* * *

Long Live the King
Writer Stephanie Foo proves all egg rolls are not created equally.

* * *

'I think I can take that spot'
Davidson's Hyunjung Lee wants to make history in the NBA.


3.11.2022

They Call Us Bruce 151: They Call Us Domee Shi

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome Oscar-winning filmmaker Domee Shi, writer/director of the Pixar animated feature Turning Red. They discuss making an unapologetically Asian Canadian story, intergenerational drama, releasing the beast within, and accepting your whole self -- even your whole self is a giant red panda.


3.06.2022

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'No longer completely invisible': New book explores Asian American pop history from '90s till today
"A nearly 500-page collage of comics, essays and interviews, RISE is a homage to the seminal moments in sports, politics and entertainment that came to define contemporary Asian American culture."

* * *

From 'The Joy Luck Club' to 'Crazy Rich Asians,' a new book hopes to 'fill in the blanks'
"So much of the way that Asians are perceived is because someone else has been writing the rules of what it means to be Asian American and Asian in this country. We wanted to create our own narrative where we have some agency in the way that it's told."

* * *

Bay Area natives’ new book, a wide-ranging cultural tapestry, charts Asian Americans' long rise
For the record, while Philip and I hail from the Bay Area, Jeff is a born and bred New Yorker.

* * *

Can a Restaurant Become a Second Home?
Years after filmmaker Bao Nguyen left his suburban home for college in New York City, he's begun to search local restaurants for a taste of home.

* * *

Meet Emma Eun-joo Choi, NPR's newest (and youngest) host
Emma Eun-joo Choi is the host of Everyone & Their Mom, an off-shoot of her work on NPR's long standing Wait Wait Don't Tell Me news and comedy program.

* * *

Patti Harrison Means It (Except When She Doesn't)
The rising star of comedy discusses I Think You Should Leave, corporatized wokeness, A.D.H.D., and humor that swerves between sarcasm and sincerity.

* * *

After Yang Asks: "What Makes Someone Asian?"
In his stunning new film After Yang, Kogonada dissects identity through a thoughtful sci-fi story.


3.04.2022

They Call Us Bruce 150: They Call Us RISE

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, recorded on the eve of our long-anticipated book release, we welcome co-author Philip Wang and project manager Jes Vu, our co-conspirators on RISE: A Pop History of Asian America From the Nineties to Now. We discuss some exclusive behind-the-scenes details on the making of the book, including The Good, The Bad and The WTF.


2.27.2022

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Whatever happened to Short Round? Ke Huy Quan returns to the big screen
Ke Huy Quan was of the '80s' most recognizable child stars thanks to his roles as Short Round in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and Data in The Goonies. So why did he quit acting? And what lured him back in front of the camera after 35 years away?

* * *

Michelle Yeoh goes on a mind-bending trip in Everything Everywhere All at Once
Actress Michelle Yeoh who has broken boundaries and bones across her genre-spanning career, takes on her most ambitious project yet: saving the multiverse.

* * *

How Do I Talk to My Daughter About Violence Against Asian Women?
"Should I tell you that I don't want you to walk through the world afraid, even though I have sometimes walked through the world afraid?"

* * *

Stephanie Foo on Gaining Agency From C-PTSD
Stephanie Foo's memoir, What My Bones Know, details her painful experiences with childhood abuse, and the long, indirect path she took to healing as an adult.

* * *

The Nostalgic Glory of the '90s Chinese Buffet
The all-you-can-eat restaurants of Naureen Khan's childhood -- the China Gardens, Super Buffets, and King Woks -- are dying out.

* * *

J. Kenji López-Alt Says You’re Cooking Just Fine
Ahead of the release of his new book, The Wok, food columnist J. Kenji López-Alt reflects on kitchen-bro culture, who gets credit for recipes, and how not to be an asshole.

* * *

John Cho’s young adult novel about the L.A. riots wants us to look beyond 'rooftop Koreans'
Troublemaker. John Cho's new young adult novel about the 1992 Los Angeles riots, is a sincere attempt to make sense of an event that we are still trying to understand.

* * *

An Actor Who Cedes the Spotlight While Quietly Commanding It
Daniel K. Isaac, a theater actor with a steady gig on the series Billions is appearing at the Public in Lloyd Suh’s play The Chinese Lady.

2.25.2022

RISE: Help Us Celebrate the Release of Our Book

Friday, March 4 at the Japanese American National Museum


If you're in Los Angeles, I invite you to help us celebrate the publication of RISE: A Pop History of Asian America From the Nineties to Now, the book I wrote with Jeff Yang and Philip Wang. It's been a long road getting this book to the finish line, but at long last, you can hold it in your grubby hands and read the dang thing.

RISE Is a love letter to our community, chronicling the ups and downs, struggles and triumphs, personalitis and ideas that have shaped who we our today. Through intimiate recollections, exclusive interviews, graphic essays, annotated illustrations and more -- thanks, in part, to an amazing squad of contributors -- we assembled a chronicle of the last three decades of Asian America that we hope will inspire delight, nostalgia and exploration.

Please join us Friday, March 4 at the Japanese American National Museum for a book talk, signing and reception with me, Jeff, Philip and a bunch of a amazing folks who made this book possible.

2.20.2022

Read These



Remembering Linsanity
In an exclusive, illustrated excerpt from our upcoming book RISE: A Pop History of Asian America From the Nineties to Now, Jeremy Lin remembers his road to the NBA and reflects on where "Linsanity" led.

* * *

My Family Lost Our Farm During Japanese Incarceration. I Went Searching for What Remains.
"Japanese Americans who were forced off their land lost property worth an estimated $3.7 billion in today’s dollars, and $7.7 billion worth of income... But not all losses are quantifiable, even in estimates. How can we count the communities dispersed, the culture disappeared? In the 80 years since, there’s been another loss: the memories of survivors of this forced removal."

* * *

Eileen Gu's Olympic run launches her into stardom and the political fray
Freestyle skiier Eileen Gu's epic success comes in tandem with a highly controversial Winter Olympics and an increasingly strained relationship between China and the United State.

* * *

Why Chinese Americans Are Talking About Eileen Gu
The critical crossfire Ms. Gu has faced has implications that go far beyond the Olympic slopes, Chinese Americans say. And some see themselves in the duality she has embraced.

* * *

Eileen Gu, the Olympics and who gets to be American
"It seems we can’t let an Olympics pass without wondering whether an Asian American athlete is truly American. Every four years, the Olympic team gets more diverse, and every four years, the American media fumbles for the words to describe them."

* * *

Kristi Yamaguchi won gold 30 years ago. American figure skating would never look the same.
When Kristi Yamaguchi became the first Asian American woman to win gold at the Winter Olympics 30 years ago, she changed the face of U.S. figure skating.

* * *

The surgeon general's young daughter got COVID. This is what he wants you to know
U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy says he wishes vaccines for kids under 5 were available, but that more data is needed first.

* * *

The Millions of People Stuck in Pandemic Limbo
What does society owe immunocompromised people?

* * *

Here's why your shoes will be staying the hell out of my house
A Wall Street Journal essay about keeping shoes on inside the house left many Asian Americans aghast.

* * *

Cheetos Flamin' Hots Made Me Who I Am
In middle school, Summer Kim Lee envied the wealthy white kids. But she had something they didn't have, too.

* * *

What Min Jin Lee Wants Us to See
Min Jin Lee, author of Pachinko and Free Food for Millionaires, discusses her research process, her memories of arriving in America, and why she reads the Bible before writing.

* * *

Tablo of Epik High on Success, Bullying & the Stories That Got Him Here
"All the things we did wrong and that we suffered through got us here," Korean rapper Tablo says.

* * *

How Sun and Jin's relationship went from problematic to transcendent on Lost
Here's why this underrated Lost couple is ranked Entertainment Weekly's No. 1 TV romance of all time.


2.18.2022

They Call Us Bruce 149: They Call Us Shoes Off

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we round up The Good, The Bad and The WTF of the week, including Ali Wong's latest standup special, Asian American excellence at the Winter Olympics, anti-Asian violence, Wrong Asians, and taking off your damn shoes inside the house.


2.14.2022

Twenty-One Angry Years

Happy Angryversary



Here we are again.

Honestly, with everything going on these days, I almost forgot. But on this day in 2001, I started this website. I hit the upload button on the very first rickety-ass HTML iteration of what I would eventually learn was called a blog. I've been doing this damn thing for 21 years. Angry Asian Man is allowed in the bar.

Every year I write this post, I am more bewildered about this journey and how I got here. I know I say this pretty regularly, but when I started this blog, I had no idea I was starting something. And certainly not the "something" that would go on to define my personal and professional identity for the next two decades and beyond.

Other things have become clearer. Raising the issues, fighting for visibility and engaging in hard conversations about our Asian American identities and communities are not more relevant and vital right now -- they've always been relevant and vital. I'm tired, and I'm twenty-one years older, but my work is not done. Our work's not done.

That said, I have to acknowledge that, in terms of output, I'm not the blogger I once was. My attention, time and resources have been diverted in a lot of different directions that pull me away from posting here -- fun stuff, like podcasts and writing a book, but also general adult life concerns like the safety and well-being of loved ones, paying the billz, my own mental health, and the goddamn COVID-19.

Truthfully, there are just days that I feel overloaded and paralyzed.

But other thing I know for sure after twenty-one years, none of this would be possible without my community. The hands-down best thing about this whole endeavor are the people that it has put in my path. The partners, the collaborators, the challengers, the teachers, the listeners, the readers. On the most difficult days, you've had my back, and in our most joyous moments, the celebrations are sweeter because we got there together.

Thank you being on this journey with me. Twenty-one years. I'll take that drink.

Stay Angry.


2.13.2022

Read These



Who's winning at the Winter Olympics? Asian Americans, and that's a big deal
Asian Americans have had a stellar performance during the Beijing Olympics, with heavyweights like Nathan Chen, Eileen Gu and Chloe Kim pulling in gold medals in a breathtaking fashion.

* * *

The Asian American Pipeline in Figure Skating
For the second consecutive Winter Games, four of the six figure skaters who arrived to represent the United States in the singles events were Asian American. The chain of success stretches back for years and has only strengthened as more have poured into the sport and become Olympic stars.

* * *

More than 20 years later, Michelle Kwan still holds a special place in hearts of Asian Americans
Michelle Kwan still holds a special place in the hearts of Asian American millennials, who have continued to follow the two-time Olympic medalist and five-time world champion throughout her career.

* * *

I'm an Asian American Harvard student. The anti-affirmative-action case does not speak for me.
"As president of the Asian American Association at Harvard and the son of an immigrant family, I have a message for those who oppose affirmative action: Do not use the Asian American community to advance your political agenda."

* * *

Meet the 1st Asian American mayor of a major Midwestern city; Flood maps shortfalls
Cincinnati's new Mayor Aftab Pureval is the first Asian American mayor of a major city in the Midwest. He talks to NPR about the Bengals in the Super Bowl and his plans to tackle gun violence, climate change and other challenges.

* * *

For these Asian American adoptees, celebrating the Lunar New Year means creating new traditions
For Asian American adoptees, Lunar New Year can be complicated: They may not partake in rituals handed down through generations. For many, traditions start with themselves, burnished by an alchemy of research, adaptation and a continuous revision of self-discovery.

* * *

My Mother Told Stories Through Hmong Embroidery, I Use the Pen
Lisa Lee Herrick recalls how her mother's Hmong embroidery lessons shapes the stories she writes.

* * *

Ming-Na Wen Worked Her Ass Off To Be Here
Ming-Na Wen has long attributed her success to luck. Now, she's finally giving herself credit.


2.10.2022

They Call Us Bruce 148: They Call Us Dante Basco

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome the one and only Dante Basco. He talks about his directorial debut The Fabulous Filipino Brothers, making a movie with his family -- his entire family -- growing up in Hollywood, and being perpetually linked to iconic characters, including Prince Zuko and, of course, RUFIO.


2.06.2022

Read These



The Legacy of Linsanity, 10 Years Later
A decade after Jeremy Lin's NBA breakout, Lin and some of the people who observed his sudden ascent reflect on the excitement and lasting cultural significance of his heroics for the Knicks in February 2012.

* * *

Stop asking freestyle skier Eileen Gu about her political views
Having first competed for Team USA and now competing for China, freestyle skier Eileen Gu has been caught up in geopolitical tensions surrounding the Beijing Winter Olympics.

* * *

San Francisco apologizes for racism against Chinese Americans
San Francisco has become the latest major California city to apologize for its history of racist and discriminatory acts and policies against Chinese Americans.

* * *

How the Pandemic and Anti-Asian Violence Spurred 2 States to Change History Lessons
New Jersey and Illinois have passed legislation requiring Asian American history lessons – and other states are trying to follow suit.

* * *

How One Dance Studio Became a Bulwark Against Loneliness in New York City's Chinatown
In the midst of rising rates of Anti-Asian hate crimes and social isolation for many Chinese immigrants, one dance studio created a safe social space for New York City's Chinatown seniors.

* * *

A St. Louis woman discovered her mom’s secret past — as a Vietnamese rock star
Far from simply entertaining troops, Dr. Hannah Ha learned, her mom had been a recording artist who worked with South Vietnam's top composers in the scene's 1960s heyday. She performed under the stage name Phương Tâm.

* * *

Notes on Work
There's a masochistic pride to overworking. How heavy a workload can I truly handle? How many plates can I keep in the air?

* * *

How Cleaning for the Lunar New Year Helps Me Let Go of the Past
Grace Hwang Lynch cleans in preparation for the Lunar New Year, and in doing so, lets go of the past.

* * *

60% of the World's Seeds are Owned by Corporations. How Farmer Kristyn Leach is Resisting.
Namu Farms in Winters, California is one of several small farms cultivating Asian heritage vegetables.

* * *

The Anxiety of Exclamation Points
For Lan Samantha Chang, exclamation points are part of a decades-long project to be as truthful as possible to her lived experience as a child of immigrants.

* * *

'We're Putting a Piece of Ourselves Out There': The Linda Lindas Talk 'Growing Up' on Debut LP
The Linda Lindas, who went viral last year with their punk anthem "Racist, Sexist Boy," will release their debut full-length album Growing Up on April 8.


2.03.2022

They Call Us Bruce 147: They Call Us Year of the Tiger

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. (Almost) each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

In this episode, we welcome Potluck Podcast pals Ada Tseng (Saturday School) and Raman Sehgal (Modern Minorities, Quarantined Comics) to celebrate the Lunar New Year and discuss superstitions, superheroes, Michelle Yeoh, Lou Diamond Phillips, urine, basement bunkers and utility journalism.


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